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does the applecare 1 year warranty require all the original parts for repair? like i've upgrade my 4GB RAM to an even greater one 8GB RAM, would they ask for the original parts that came with the the MBP (4GB RAM)? :confused:

cheers

-ben
 

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does the applecare 1 year warranty require all the original parts for repair? like i've upgrade my 4GB RAM to an even greater one 8GB RAM, would they ask for the original parts that came with the the MBP (4GB RAM)? :confused:

cheers

-ben
Adding extra RAM doesn't void the warranty and customers are free to have that done. You can bring it in for warranty service with the extra RAM in it. Only thing is, if the problem was related to the RAM, Apple wouldn't cover that through their Warranty, you'd have to get claim warranty through the RAM manufacture to have the RAM replaced.
 

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However Apple corporate techs have been known to send machines back with the 3rd party RAM in a baggie and a note saying "Incompatible RAM" even when that isn't true and they haven't actually checked for the real problem. In that respect, you are better off going to an independent authorized Apple service centre than to Apple.

If you have your original RAM still, it's not a bad idea to reinstall it before sending the machine in. If nothing else, it proves that your failure is not RAM related.
 

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Adding extra RAM doesn't void the warranty and customers are free to have that done. You can bring it in for warranty service with the extra RAM in it. Only thing is, if the problem was related to the RAM, Apple wouldn't cover that through their Warranty, you'd have to get claim warranty through the RAM manufacture to have the RAM replaced.
Does that apply the same for the MBP SATA hard drive? it says on the warranty that warranty process could have to reformat the hard drive in any case resulting in loss of content. i can't back up my files to an external hard drive since my MBP won't even start upon turning the power on. i can't risk loosing my files. so my question is, could i bring in my MBP with the SATA hard drive taken out for warranty service? in other words, sending my machine for repair without the SATA hard drive. :confused:
 

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Does that apply the same for the MBP SATA hard drive? it says on the warranty that warranty process could have to reformat the hard drive in any case resulting in loss of content. i can't back up my files to an external hard drive since my MBP won't even start upon turning the power on. i can't risk loosing my files. so my question is, could i bring in my MBP with the SATA hard drive taken out for warranty service? in other words, sending my machine for repair without the SATA hard drive. :confused:
I wouldn't advocate doing that. The hard drive itself could be the problem. (why, oh why, have you not got backups???) :eek:

What is the issue with your MBP? You might want to try describing them (fully - the whole sequence of events, exactly which MBP model you're using, OS, RAM, HD etc.) and seeing if anyone here has any suggestions.

At the very least, explain your problem to the techs when you take the MBP in for service.

You do have one other option - remove the drive yourself, install it in an external enclosure, and if it is actually operational, copy your files (would suggest ONLY copying that which you cannot otherwise replace or reinstall - ie: photos, documents, music etc., but NOT applications or anything else you can reinstall) to another Mac. Of course that requires that you buy an external enclosure, and that you have access to another Mac with sufficient HD space to help out. Then put the drive back in your Mac and take it in for service. If the drive is working fine as an external, at least you'll know that mechanically, it's working and that its file structure is not so damaged that you cannot retrieve files. And you'll have an external drive case ready for another drive so that you can, in future, MAKE BACKUPS. I can't begin to stress how important this is, if you value the data on your computer. Hard drives are easily the most likely thing to fail on a computer. They have moving parts with very low tolerances. They fail. Data recovery is thousands of dollars. An external backup drive can be had for $100.
 

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.... MAKE BACKUPS. I can't begin to stress how important this is, if you value the data on your computer. Hard drives are easily the most likely thing to fail on a computer. They have moving parts with very low tolerances. They fail. Data recovery is thousands of dollars. An external backup drive can be had for $100.


Echo, Echo, Echo ........
 

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I wouldn't advocate doing that. The hard drive itself could be the problem. (why, oh why, have you not got backups???) :eek:

What is the issue with your MBP? You might want to try describing them (fully - the whole sequence of events, exactly which MBP model you're using, OS, RAM, HD etc.) and seeing if anyone here has any suggestions.

At the very least, explain your problem to the techs when you take the MBP in for service.

You do have one other option - remove the drive yourself, install it in an external enclosure, and if it is actually operational, copy your files (would suggest ONLY copying that which you cannot otherwise replace or reinstall - ie: photos, documents, music etc., but NOT applications or anything else you can reinstall) to another Mac. Of course that requires that you buy an external enclosure, and that you have access to another Mac with sufficient HD space to help out. Then put the drive back in your Mac and take it in for service. If the drive is working fine as an external, at least you'll know that mechanically, it's working and that its file structure is not so damaged that you cannot retrieve files. And you'll have an external drive case ready for another drive so that you can, in future, MAKE BACKUPS. I can't begin to stress how important this is, if you value the data on your computer. Hard drives are easily the most likely thing to fail on a computer. They have moving parts with very low tolerances. They fail. Data recovery is thousands of dollars. An external backup drive can be had for $100.
here's what happend. the night before i was streaming for a long time, i'd say 3-4hrs, i won't get with the details. the fan speeds up from time to time atleast 5 or 6 times or so from what i can remember, atleast 15-30 mins apart. shut the machine down and went to sleep. the next morning it wouldn't start upon turning on the power button. it did exactly this:

YouTube - HELP MacBook Pro Won't Start

i know i did something wrong there. thanx i'll be sure to look into that external enclosure you mentioned, it doesn't cost too bad. i have a friend with a 13" MBP, my plan was to install my hard drive to her machine and then back up my files to my 1TB external hardrive. will this work? :confused:

my specs are MBP 15" 2.6GHz 8GB RAM 500GB HD intel core i7 with bootcamp windows7 100GB OS X/400GB windows.
 

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here's what happend. the night before i was streaming for a long time, i'd say 3-4hrs, i won't get with the details. the fan speeds up from time to time atleast 5 or 6 times or so from what i can remember, atleast 15-30 mins apart. shut the machine down and went to sleep. the next morning it wouldn't start upon turning on the power button. it did exactly this:

YouTube - HELP MacBook Pro Won't Start

i know i did something wrong there. thanx i'll be sure to look into that external enclosure you mentioned, it doesn't cost too bad. i have a friend with a 13" MBP, my plan was to install my hard drive to her machine and then back up my files to my 1TB external hardrive. will this work? :confused:

my specs are MBP 15" 2.6GHz 8GB RAM 500GB HD intel core i7 with bootcamp windows7 100GB OS X/400GB windows.
Rather than mess around with your friend's MBP (which may be under warranty, no?) I'd recommend the external drive route. You can hook THAT up to your friend's Mac, and then copy any files onto the 1TB external. (And what were you using that external for, if not for backups? SuperDuper or Carbon Copy Cloner are your friends...) There is absolutely no harm in having TWO external drives, btw - I assume your 1TB drive is a 3.5" drive (full size) and an enclosure to fit the internal drive from the MBP will be 2.5" - much smaller and more portable. You could use Time Machine on the 1TB and SuperDuper on the smaller drive. SuperDuper makes a bootable clone - very handy in cases where the internal drive goes toes up and you still need to get work done. Just restart, booting from the external!
 

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i decided not to mess with my friend's mbp. it turns out that one of my buddy at college had a 2.5 external enclosure and backed up my files to my 1TB external hard drive using his desktop. and so i took in my machine for speculation to my local apple retail store. they just said that the logic board was faulty and that everything was fine in terms of hardware. they had to replace the logic board which cost $700+. took 4 days for the replacement to come in. took 2 days to repair. customer service was excellent although i'd give the repair 4/5 since i got my machine back with minor scratches on the bottom area. overall the repair took 1 and a half weeks. my macbook pro is back to normal. thanks for the help boys. i'll be sure to back up ever so often.
 
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