Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
It'll be interesting to see how this venture works out. It has some awesome features for sure. The durability features are pretty cool. Sealed keyboard? Why is this not a standard feature on ALL laptops?

I'd like to check one out for sure, the only bad part of it is that RedHat is involved, which means it will probably develop irritating...(well never mind, that's a personal rant. ;) )
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,441 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Christmas 2007

Just in time for Christmas this year. ...

"Just in time for Christmas, the cutting-edge "$100 laptop" computing device, which is intended to transform education for the world's poor, will be sold to North Americans -- at a heftier price and with a philanthropic catch.
If a U.S. and Canadian gadget fan wants to play with the much-anticipated piece of gear, he or she will have to spend $399 U.S., buying one for himself or herself, and another to be donated to a child in the developing world.
The One Laptop Per Child Foundation, a U.S. non-profit organization, is to announce today the limited, quickie philanthropic campaign running from Nov. 12 to 26.

The first laptop, the green and white "XO" model, is to begin production in November, with 120,000 units to be made by the end of the year ...

...It can be powered by pull cords, solar panels, and hand cranks and operate for 12 hours on one battery charge. The water-resistant, rubber-sealed machines contain no moving parts except a hinge and rabbit-ear antennae that automatically network the laptops with one another. Its high-resolution screen can be read in direct sunlight. The XO uses a picture-based interface on top of a Linux-based operating system.
The machine comes with a built-in video camera and custom, open-source software for making music, creating art, playing games, browsing the web, and word processing. ... "

Please see: http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=099c12a7-1202-4136-9d0f-4f2a60f80834&k=95277
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,427 Posts
Too bad the whole idea of the $100 laptop has vanished - it is now $188; and that is $400 for people in the western world. For what you would get, it is not really competitive with the selection of good quality used machines available, nor it is really competitive with some of the lower quality new machines being pumped out of China.

I think $188 will prove to be too expensive for those nations that have massive problems with starvation, while the $400 here (for subsidizing the third world machines) is perhaps too high. The original idea of $100/$200 machine was a better deal as for $200, I'd buy one for doing various projects, while I would pass on a $400 machine when I can buy a used Apple for less.

They do offer some significant features; and it is high time that the Government take a stand against the tactics of greed practiced by the Evil Empire and the dullards at Intel. Intel does not have the know how to make a low power processor like the AMD Geode used in te OLPC, nor can they posibly cram a word processor into a half gig of memory. It is a real tragedy that for those who could really take advantage of all of those things that are promised by computing technology; that the fat rich bastards are simply out to kill off this worthwhile idea.

Unless the cost of electricity goes up any further, then I'd want a laptop with a hand crank!
 
G

·
I think $188 will prove to be too expensive for those nations that have massive problems with starvation, while the $400 here (for subsidizing the third world machines) is perhaps too high. The original idea of $100/$200 machine was a better deal as for $200, I'd buy one for doing various projects, while I would pass on a $400 machine when I can buy a used Apple for less.

They do offer some significant features; and it is high time that the Government take a stand against the tactics of greed practiced by the Evil Empire and the dullards at Intel. Intel does not have the know how to make a low power processor like the AMD Geode used in te OLPC, nor can they posibly cram a word processor into a half gig of memory. It is a real tragedy that for those who could really take advantage of all of those things that are promised by computing technology; that the fat rich bastards are simply out to kill off this worthwhile idea.

Unless the cost of electricity goes up any further, then I'd want a laptop with a hand crank!
Why so down on Intel ... why not be down on AMD for not giving them a better deal on the processors to get them to the $100 mark?

So you are saying that instead of spending your $$ to support their venture -- and sponsor a child somewhere that can get some real use out of this piece of hardware -- you will instead give your support to the "fat rich bastards" at Apple and in turn Intel? beejacon

Once these machines hit the streets I'll probably do this for sure. Not only are you bringing this technology to a child somewhere that I'm sure will appreciate it greatly, you are also getting a portable computer that can run completely off the grid for prolonged periods of time. That alone is worth the $$ to me.

What I'd also love to see happen is a dual-sponsorship sort of thing through educational channels here. Sponsor kids here to get them a machine, which in turns also provides a unit to another child that will benefit from it in a lesser able nation and hook them up together over the internet ... like penpals in the 21st century, but with technology instead of pen and paper and provide the potential for BOTH of the children to learn a lot stuff they may not otherwise have the opportunity to learn both from each and and the technology that they share.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,427 Posts
Why so down on Intel ...
For one, Intel is trying so hard to derail the OLPC project, and has been using strong armed tactics to do so. Instead of being a part of the project; or offering a comparable product; they have been ruthless in trying to ruin the OLPC just because the whole concept of a power efficient processor goes against the entire philosophy of Intel's "make the processor run as hot as possible" mode of thinking. AMD's Geode processor is light years ahead of the garbage coming out of Intel. Intel is the next Evil Empire...

why not be down on AMD for not giving them a better deal on the processors to get them to the $100 mark?
AMD has given them an excellent deal. I think the hangups are mostly to do with the cost of the screen and long range wireless. Intel should just shelve their Classroom PC garbage, and let the OLPC thrive on it's own accord.

you will instead give your support to the "fat rich bastards" at Apple and in turn Intel?
None of my Apple equipment uses Intel. I prefer the PowerPC, though it will one day be dated and I will be off once again seeking a processor that does not store numbers backwards in memory, and one that does not heat the house up. Rather than giving handouts, I would rather see the western world sponsor real progress. The OLPC is real progress as the children that use them will learn about real computers, not useless Windoze flim-flam. That is, if the OLPC people thought about the provision of programming languages on the platform.

appreciate it greatly, you are also getting a portable computer that can run completely off the grid for prolonged periods of time. That alone is worth the $$ to me.
For the features it has, it is worth $200; but not $400 because a used Pismo will outperform it. I was disappointed because their goal was $100, so even if it was $150, it would be worthy, but $200 is probably too steep, simply because for $400, I can recycle older machinery that will do the tasks I want without the concessions. Of course, none of the hackers have their hands on it so no one really knows what can be done with the beast.

What I'd also love to see happen is a dual-sponsorship sort of thing through educational channels here.
I think kids have too much exposure to computers; and not enough exposure to such things as pen and paper, thinking, studying... All of those things that make it almost impossible to hire a young person these days because they can not even fill out a job application.

I am a big fan of progress, real progress; not the flim-flam they call progress these days... Now the powers that be really do need to get onto the OLPC, get it down to $100, and force Intel from trying to derail this most worthy project. I'd go so far as to take the Intel board out and shoot them if they do not recant their mean position; that is what Stalin would have done. This project is not about fat profit margins; but about correcting the abuses heaped upon the world by the hard capitalists.
 
G

·
dude, I have to say you're talking out your a$$ on several fronts here, as well as contradicting yourself in a few places. You seem to have enough knowledge to sound impressive, but you're dangerous at the same time. Some responses in random order:

the whole concept of a power efficient processor goes against the entire philosophy of Intel's "make the processor run as hot as possible" mode of thinking
Funny ... never did see a G5 in a portable... why? Heat and power consumption issues that IBM couldn't solve. I'm a RISC fan as much as anyone else, but there's a reason that Apple bailed on PowerPC and went to Intel.

store numbers backward in memory
It's called endianess, and you should look it up before you insert your foot in your mouth again :p You have a partial of a grasp of it, but obviously not enough to really understand what's going on there . . . having personally ported quite a lot of applications with endianess problems I can tell you that it is not a big deal at all.

For the features it has, it is worth $200; but not $400
And all you're paying for it is $200 ... the other $200 sponsors a second machine! There's more to this whole project than the immediate value it will provide you. :eek:

a used Pismo will outperform it
Ok .. when I get my OLPC I'll take you up on that a challenge. Let's take our machines away from a power source and crunch numbers for 12 hours :D

That is, if the OLPC people thought about the provision of programming languages on the platform.
It uses the GNU toolchain, the same as OSX does.

I'll walk away from this discussion at this point. You have your opinions, I have mine, and they obviously differ.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,013 Posts
We've got our name in for the pairing program and encouraging others to support on our website the way we do with Bullfrog.

This has to stay opensource and away from anything proprietary. It's the right concept and the price will drop.

Looking forward to getting ours. :clap:
Glad to see this coming to fruition. Hard work on Negroponte's part and a worthy goal.

One Laptop per Child (OLPC), a $100 laptop for the world's children's education
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,427 Posts
Funny ... never did see a G5 in a portable... why? Heat and power consumption issues that IBM couldn't solve. I'm a RISC fan as much as anyone else, but there's a reason that Apple bailed on PowerPC and went to Intel.
Apple didn't bail out; Motorola bowed out of the industry, thinking they could make more money with cell phones than they could with their other products. The successor, Freescale, basically decided to support the automotive industry only. The G5 was an IBM creation, and since IBM also bowed out of the industry, Apple was left with either Intel or AMD. Of these, the Core processor seemed to be a pretty progressive chip, though not as reliable as the PPC.

... a lot of applications with endianess problems I can tell you that it is not a big deal at all.
For me it is. The PPC allowed for the selection of endianess; and under OSX, the proper methods are used. Intel has always kept with the deficiencies of their 4004 processor, and despite the promises of the N10 project that they chose to scuttle, they remain in this retrograde mindset. Having to flip all of the numbers around, and dealing with processor cores that have little orthogonality just leads to so much waste. But then, my view is entirely in the minority since most programmers love to store numbers backwards in memory.

I must admit that I am not an insider of the OLPC project; and I base much of my estimate on a very interesting piece on 60 Minutes. Altruism aside, people will pay for something they see as value, and the $100 OLPC would gain a very large audience, while a $200 machine, well, considerable less. If the machine was $100 ($200 here), then I'd probably buy one; but at $200 ($400 here), I'd buy a used machine. Of course there is the donation factor, but the OLPC is not exciting enough of a box for $400. Now there are spinoffs. I'd love to have a sealed keyboard and a more durable screen. Oh, and a hand crank, that would come in handy when I run out of power out in the back and beyond.

It uses the GNU toolchain, the same as OSX does.
I did not know that. It sounded like it was some kind of proprietary system derived from Red Hat that only had a GUI and a few programs. If it has a C compiler, then it may turn into a rather useful machine.
 
G

·
PPC Macs do not allow "selection" of endianness, they run big-endian. _Some_ PPC chips allowed selection of running either big-endian or little-endian (depending on the hardware you wanted to design them around) but Apple never did anyything but big-endian -- as almost everyone did with a few rare exceptions.

As for "proper methods" there is no such thing. Either it's big or little endian and the software, if written correctly, just has to know this at the time of compilation. Properly written software is very very simple to do this with, generally a few lines of code and an added check to the configure.in script and voila, it reads from MSB to LSB with no issues.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,013 Posts
Hands on with David Pogue



NY Times Advertisement

Good article and video of the unit in action. :clap:

The truth is, the XO laptop, now in final testing, is absolutely amazing, and in my limited tests, a total kid magnet. Both the hardware and the software exhibit breakthrough after breakthrough — some of them not available on any other laptop, for $400 or $4,000.

In the places where the XO will be used, power is often scarce. So the laptop uses a new battery chemistry, called lithium ferro-phosphate. It runs at one-tenth the temperature of a standard laptop battery, costs $10 to replace, and is good for 2,000 charges — versus 500 on a regular laptop battery.

The laptop consumes an average of 2 watts, compared with 60 or more on a typical business laptop. That’s one reason it gets such great battery life. A small yo-yo-like pull-cord charger is available (one minute of pulling provides 10 minutes of power); so is a $12 solar panel that, although only one foot square, provides enough power to recharge or power the machine.

Speaking of bright sunshine: the XO’s color screen is bright and, at 200 dots an inch, razor sharp (1,200 by 900 pixels). But it has a secret identity: in bright sun, you can turn off the backlight altogether. The resulting display, black on light gray, is so clear and readable, it’s almost like paper. Then, of course, the battery lasts even longer.

The XO offers both regular wireless Internet connections and something called mesh networking, which means that all the laptops see each other, instantly, without any setup — even when there’s no Internet connection.

With one press of a button, you see a map. Individual XO logos — color-coded to differentiate them — represent other laptops in the area; you connect with one click. (You never double-click in the XO’s visual, super-simple operating system. You either point with the mouse or click once.)

This feature has some astonishing utility. If only one laptop has an Internet connection, for example, the others can get online, too, thanks to the mesh network. And when O.L.P.C. releases software upgrades, one laptop can broadcast them to other nearby laptops.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,251 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,251 Posts
Looks like there is a meme starting on this issue...

The EeePC was released last week.. Which is an Asus response to the OLPC. This one has an intel chip and can run a mobile version of Windows XP, but runs a Linux variant for now.





 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,013 Posts
Exactly why a public component for vital aspects of communal society is critical - stimulates this kind of action.

Now about shelter.....the $100 house next ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,013 Posts
One Laptop Per Child: the dream starts to deliver



One of the "100 Dollar Laptops" is presented in the Hasso-Plattner Institute 07 June 2007 in Potsdam, eastern Germany. Low-cost computers meant to usher poor children worldwide into the digital age are being mass produced in China as US nonprofit One Laptop Per Child strives to deliver on its promise.

Low-cost computers meant to usher poor children worldwide into the digital age are being mass produced in China as US nonprofit One Laptop Per Child strives to deliver on its promise.

Free Information Technology white papers, downloads and podcasts
"Against all the naysayers ... we have developed and now manufactured the world's most advanced and greenest laptop and one designed specifically to instill a passion for learning in children," Negroponte said.

A challenge for the organization has been that governments have not backed effusive words of support with willing flows of cash to buy laptops for children inside their borders.

It is hoped that a "Give One Get One" (G1G1) campaign starting Monday will boost orders by providing an incentive to people in more prosperous countries.

For every laptop donated for a child, the donor gets a laptop. The original price was to be 100 dollars (US) per laptop but nearly doubled as costs climbed after Negroponte launched the initiative in 2005.

Telecom firm T-Mobile USA is offering people a year of free access to its nearly 8,500 wireless Internet hotspots in the United States if they become G1G1 donors.

The world's largest video game maker, Electronic Arts in Northern California, said this week they are giving the original "SimCity" to OLPC to put on laptops for free.

The "SimCity" franchise debuted in 1989. Players build communities from scratch, laying out roads, housing, factories, shops, tax codes, power plants and more in order to create places where citizens can work and live happily.

Acting as virtual "mayors," players must be ready to deal with disasters such as earthquakes, fires and floods.

"Players learn to use limited resources to build and customize their cities," said EA vice president Steve Seabolt.

"There are choices and consequences, but in the end, it's a creativity tool. The game should prove to be an incredibly effective way of making the laptop relevant, engaging, and fun."

SimCity has been used in US schools.

The list of companies backing OLPC with cash, technology or other resources includes Google, Intel, eBay, Advance Micro Devices, and News Corporation.

XO laptop operating systems are based on free open-source software. The machines are designed to use less than a tenth the power than standard laptops and come with solar or hand-crank charging options.

XO laptops are billed as a "kids machine" designed for rugged environments. The computers have built in video and still cameras as well as wireless Internet connectivity.

OLPC will begin distributing XO laptops in Uruguay, Peru, Mexico, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Haiti, Cambodia and India by the end of the year, according to EA.

Negroponte is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor who is the younger brother of the US deputy secretary of state.

OLPC's stated mission is "to design, manufacture and distribute laptop computers that are sufficiently affordable to provide every child in the world access to new channels of learning, sharing and self-expression."

The group envisions selling laptops to governments in developing nations, which give them to school-aged children and have stakes in supporting their use.

"Imagine the impact of every child owning a laptop computer that he/she can use in school and take home," OLPC said in a written release.

"By empowering children to educate themselves, a new generation will ultimately be better prepared to tackle the other serious problems (poverty, malnutrition, disease) facing their societies."
:clap:

I'm hoping to participate tomorrow in the first Buy One Give One round.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top