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-   -   More Adobe shenanigans... Any good alternative to Acrobat Pro? (http://www.ehmac.ca/showthread.php?t=140866)

heavyall Apr 9th, 2016 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2204490)
What kind of work are doing that require a 15,000 page pdf to be printed? I have never heard of such a thing. Just saying, that astounds me, certainly not the norm.

Not uncommon with variable printing.

We recently had one that was a daytimer book, where thousands of copies were made, each one entirely customized with different text, covers, pre-printed important dates, etc, all handled as one continuous print run on the press.

I don't recall the final page count, but the pdf was over 2 GB.

screature Apr 10th, 2016 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by heavyall (Post 2204634)
Not uncommon with variable printing.

We recently had one that was a daytimer book, where thousands of copies were made, each one entirely customized with different text, covers, pre-printed important dates, etc, all handled as one continuous print run on the press.

I don't recall the final page count, but the pdf was over 2 GB.

Ok I see what you are saying, but that kind of work is uncommon in general. I suspect that kind of work is relatively rare among users of InDesign on a per capita basis.

heavyall Apr 10th, 2016 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2205258)
Ok I see what you are saying, but that kind of work is uncommon in general. I suspect that kind of work is relatively rare among users of InDesign on a per capita basis.

True. Most individual users wouldn't even know how to set it up even if that was what they wanted -- they would hire someone like us who does it all the time.

wonderings Apr 11th, 2016 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2205258)
Ok I see what you are saying, but that kind of work is uncommon in general. I suspect that kind of work is relatively rare among users of InDesign on a per capita basis.

Variable data printing is not uncommon and one of the biggest growing forms in print. Now when you seriously get into VDP (variable data print) you move into software that handles it better. Still a lot of printers like myself will use it for simple variable work.

screature Apr 11th, 2016 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by heavyall (Post 2205633)
True. Most individual users wouldn't even know how to set it up even if that was what they wanted -- they would hire someone like us who does it all the time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by wonderings (Post 2205978)
Variable data printing is not uncommon and one of the biggest growing forms in print. Now when you seriously get into VDP (variable data print) you move into software that handles it better. Still a lot of printers like myself will use it for simple variable work.

It may be the case, but as I said before, not common in general.

At any rate I do not see how this is really relevant to Adobe justifying a subscription based model as opposed to a license based model. They could have retained licensing for their software, whether 32bit or 64bit.

It seems that what is being implied is that subscription based software is being defended because Adobe only offers 64bit to subscribers. IMO that is not a very good reason to defend the subscription based model because basically what Adobe has done is to say if you need 64bit you need to subscribe and basically continue to pay forever, as opposed to a one time payment for a license. I know of no other software company that does that.

wonderings Apr 11th, 2016 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2206130)
It may be the case, but as I said before, not common in general.

At any rate I do not see how this is really relevant to Adobe justifying a subscription based model as opposed to a license based model. They could have retained licensing for their software, whether 32bit or 64bit.

It seems that what is being implied is that subscription based software is being defended because Adobe only offers 64bit to subscribers. IMO that is not a very good reason to defend the subscription based model because basically what Adobe has done is to say if you need 64bit you need to subscribe and basically continue to pay forever, as opposed to a one time payment for a license. I know of no other software company that does that.

I agree and would buy outright when I want to upgrade rather then pay monthly. All I was saying was the update to indesign made a very big difference to me and really forced my hand to go with adobe CC because I was having trouble with indesign handling large files. With Indesign CC and a native 64 bit app those problems went away. I really wish Adobe went back to the old model, have CC for those who want to pay it monthly but have an option for those of us who would rather pay once and keep the software for as long as we want.

Randy B. Singer May 4th, 2018 10:29 PM

Adobe Acrobat Pro is a high-end true PDF editing program (not just an OCR program or a program that can merely insert some text). Nothing is quite as good, but there are competitors that may be good enough, at vastly lower cost.

The key features to look for in an Acrobat alternative (for it truly to be an alternative to Acrobat) are the ability to delete/replace existing text in a PDF, and to do OCR.:

PDFpen/Pro ($75/$125) (PDFpen Pro is extremely popular with folks in my user group)
http://smilesoftware.com/PDFpen/index.html
http://smilesoftware.com/PDFpenPro/index.html#
tutorials
http://macsparky.com/search?q=pdfpen

PDF Studio Pro ($129)
http://www.qoppa.com/pdfstudio/

Wondershare PDF Editor Pro ($100)
http://www.wondershare.net/mac-pdf-editor/?icn=nav
http://www.wondershare.net/shop/buy/...ditor-mac.html

PDFelement ($99)
http://macappware.com/software/pdf-editor-pro-mac/

PDF Converter Mac ($100)
http://www.nuance.com/products/pdf-c...-mac/index.htm

iSkysoft PDF Editor Pro ($100)
http://www.iskysoft.com/pdf-editor-mac.html

Lightning PDF Professional ($80)
Lightning PDF Professional 9 for Mac | Nova Development
https://shop.novadevelopment.com/sto...?on=1072945399

Able2Extract ($150)
http://www.investintech.com/prod_a2e.htm

Personally, I like PDF Converter Mac the best, because it includes the superb OmniPage Pro OCR engine. However, the company that it comes from is so shady, and offers such poor customer support, that I can't actually recommend this product. So, instead, I recommend that you consider PDFpen Pro.

Moscool May 5th, 2018 05:04 AM

Thanks for the comprehensive review Randy.

For some reason Acrobat Pro X is back from the dead and that's what I keep using. Of the list above I would stay clear of Wondershare because they're in hte habit of brutally terminating support for apps without warning (their Video editor vanished overnight and the Music app is no longer supported)

François

chrismccoy Feb 7th, 2019 02:28 PM

i prefer pdfpenpro or pdf expert myself

Randy B. Singer May 5th, 2020 01:07 AM

A followup...

New on the scene is this product, and it is very competitive with Acrobat Pro at a fraction of the price:

Kofax Power PDF for Mac ($129)
https://www.kofax.com/Products/power...andard-for-mac

Kofax licenses the OmniPage Pro OCR engine for excellent OCR.


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