The Canadian Political Thread - Page 2418 - ehMac.ca
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Register FAQ Community Calendar Today's Posts Search Advertise


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Aug 12th, 2019, 11:34 AM   #24171
Full Citizen
 
FUXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Not Alberta
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SINC View Post
Try a poll not conducted by the bought and paid for Liberal CBC:

Majority of Canadians want change in Ottawa, 37% say they’d vote Conservative: Ipsos

https://globalnews.ca/news/5502690/a...er-ipsos-poll/

Opinion polling for the 2019 Canadian federal election

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinio...National_polls

Understanding all these wild federal election polls

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ott...lection-polls/
Hey Ass wipe. It’s from Macleans. Read much?
__________________
Just a vegetable eating, nose-breathing, limp-wristed, Tesla driving sophisticate, seeking a better place...Now advocating for gender neutral public park bathrooms in Lethbridge and St. Albert.
FUXL is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old Aug 12th, 2019, 11:41 AM   #24172
Honourable Citizen
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: S. Alberta
Posts: 20,378
Hey, $h!t stain, no kidding.

Yet one more Prog media outlet bought & paid for by Justa Turd.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FUXL View Post
Hey Ass wipe. It’s from Macleans. Read much?
__________________
Just a meat eating, mouth-breathing, knuckle-dragging, Harley riding deplorable troglodyte peoplekind, back from a better place...

“Have no respect whatsoever for authority; forget who said it and instead look what he starts with, where he ends up, and ask yourself, is it reasonable?” —Richard Feynman

“Charm and nothing but charm at last grows a little tiresome...It's a relief then to deal with a man who isn't quite so delightful but a little more sincere.” — W. Somerset Maugham
FeXL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12th, 2019, 10:31 PM   #24173
Honourable Citizen
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: S. Alberta
Posts: 20,378
~Becauth ith's 2015!

Trudeau finally pays up part of his refugee bill

Quote:
Justin Trudeau was like the deadbeat dad that wanted praise for finally paying his child support bills.

The PM showed up at the Parkdale Intercultural Association in Toronto’s west end on Monday to announce that the federal government was giving over more money to fund legal aid in Ontario when it comes to immigration and refugee cases.

“I’m not overly happy about the announcement we are about to make,” Trudeau said. “The reality is we shouldn’t be having to make this announcement.”

He’s right, the federal government shouldn’t have to make the announcement that they are funding their responsibilities rather than sticking it to the province.
__________________
Just a meat eating, mouth-breathing, knuckle-dragging, Harley riding deplorable troglodyte peoplekind, back from a better place...

“Have no respect whatsoever for authority; forget who said it and instead look what he starts with, where he ends up, and ask yourself, is it reasonable?” —Richard Feynman

“Charm and nothing but charm at last grows a little tiresome...It's a relief then to deal with a man who isn't quite so delightful but a little more sincere.” — W. Somerset Maugham
FeXL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 09:37 AM   #24174
Full Citizen
 
FUXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Not Alberta
Posts: 90
Latest from la grande dame of Canadian police journalism - Chantale Hebert

Read and weep Albertan separatists -

Mon Aug 12 13:11:00 EDT 2019
MONTREAL—Canada’s two main parties may be tied in voting intentions at the national level, but the pre-election season has so far been kinder to Justin Trudeau’s Liberals than to Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives.
The subtext of the national polls is that the first are doing better than the numbers suggest while the second are running in place.
Much of the credit for the restoring of a modest Liberal edge is owed not so much to the strategic genius of the incumbents as to some chronic weaknesses of their main rivals.
The concentration of Conservative party support in the Prairies is a big part of that party’s problem. It masks a less-than-optimal performance in the larger voting markets of central Canada. But other factors are also in play.
The competition for government remains a two-way battle between the Liberals and the Conservatives.
In the past, a strong NDP has tended to be a winning condition for the Conservatives. It was a key element in the majority victories of Brian Mulroney in 1988 and Stephen Harper in 2011.
In the reverse, the NDP was at low ebb for much of the Jean Chrétien decade.
Short of a dramatic shift in New Democrat fortunes Scheer will not be able to count on Jagmeet Singh to bleed the Liberals on his behalf in October.
In B.C. where the NDP elected its second-largest provincial contingent in 2015, the Green party is breathing down its neck.
In Quebec where the party under Thomas Mulcair and Jack Layton elected its largest contingent of MPs in the last two elections, the NDP is polling in single digits, and fighting for fourth place against the Greens.
Now that the Bloc Québécois has gotten its act together, non-Liberal Quebec voters are more likely to rediscover the sovereigntist party than to give Singh a second look.
The Liberals remain the dominant force in Quebec. Two recent polls — Abacus and Léger Marketing — pegged Trudeau’s lead in his home-province at more than 10 points.
At the same time, potential clouds on the Quebec/Ottawa horizon as a result of the arrival of a less Liberal-friendly provincial government have failed to materialize.
By all indications, Coalition Avenir Quebec’s François Legault is not poised to rain on the Liberals’ election parade and Trudeau is not going out of his way to give his Quebec counterpart a reason to do so.
The battle over the CAQ’s contentious securalism law seems destined to play out in the courts for the foreseeable future.
A potential federal-provincial showdown over immigration policy has at least for now been averted. Under pressure from the Quebec business community, Legault has to juggle his promise to reduce the province’s immigration intake with increasingly widespread labour shortages.
This summer saw the first test of the process put in place last spring to give the Quebec government input in the filling of Quebec vacancies on the Supreme Court.
Sources in both capitals say the prime minister’s choice of justice Nicholas Kasirer reflected the premier’s preference.
Legault may be a small-c conservative but as the premier of a province where the issue of climate change is top-of-mind he has little to gain from associating with a pro-pipeline anti-carbon tax Conservative party. The last thing the Quebec premier wants is to have to manage a pipeline backlash on the first watch in government of his party.
He has instructed his MNAs to stay out of the federal fray.
There are some bright spots in the Conservative party Quebec picture. At 24 per cent in the Léger and Abacus polls, the party’s score is eight points higher than its last election result. And the Conservatives have a fighting chance to take out their right-wing nemesis Maxime Bernier in his Beauce riding.
Harper and Chrétien secured majority governments with minimal Quebec support. But that was back in the days when a plurality of Quebecers voted for parties like the BQ or the NDP that kept the province on the sidelines of the battle between the Conservatives and the Liberals.
For the first time since the eighties Trudeau’s party is poised to enter a federal election with a solid edge on the competition in Quebec.
And if it has been possible to form a federal government without winning Quebec in the past, doing so while also losing Ontario is essentially a non-starter.
In Canada’s largest province, Scheer remains overshadowed by his cumbersome Queen’s Park ally Doug Ford. The latter’s association with the federal Conservatives is not only toxic for the former in Ontario. For worse rather than for better, Ford’s profile nationally is higher than that of the federal leader.
None of the above is meant to suggest that the Liberals have a second victory in the bag — far from it. But with the official launch of the campaign a little more than a month away the election — on balance — is again theirs to lose.
Chantal Hébert is a columnist based in Ottawa covering politics. Follow her on Twitter: @ChantalHbert
__________________
Just a vegetable eating, nose-breathing, limp-wristed, Tesla driving sophisticate, seeking a better place...Now advocating for gender neutral public park bathrooms in Lethbridge and St. Albert.
FUXL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 10:02 AM   #24175
Resident Curmudgeon
 
SINC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Central Alberta
Posts: 84,896
Send a message via AIM to SINC
Meh. More propaganda from a CBC affiliated so-called analyst bought and paid for (CBC/Torstar) by the Turdeau Liberals.
__________________
Visit my website:
St. Albert's Place On The Web
(Over 3.1 million folks have.)
SINC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 10:21 AM   #24176
Honourable Citizen
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 17,003
Wow trying to imply that Chantele is a credible source. That's a pretty major stretch. Her knowledge outside of Quebec is marginal and outside of Quebec/Ottawa pretty much non-existent.

Truth is both major and most satellite parties should be put out to pasture, or better yet dropped off on ice floes.
__________________
Ad links appearing in my posts were not placed there by me. I do not endorse any products which may be linked to my posts. Do not click on those links.

I retain all rights to photo-images I have posted on ehMac. They were posted that other members of the community could enjoy them. They may not be used or sold in any other way without my written consent.

Bill C-51 is an act of Terrorism! It cannot be fixed and should be immediately repealed!
eMacMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 03:22 PM   #24177
Honourable Citizen
 
Freddie_Biff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 4,745
Quote:
Originally Posted by FUXL View Post
Read and weep Albertan separatists -



Mon Aug 12 13:11:00 EDT 2019

MONTREAL—Canada’s two main parties may be tied in voting intentions at the national level, but the pre-election season has so far been kinder to Justin Trudeau’s Liberals than to Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives.

The subtext of the national polls is that the first are doing better than the numbers suggest while the second are running in place.

Much of the credit for the restoring of a modest Liberal edge is owed not so much to the strategic genius of the incumbents as to some chronic weaknesses of their main rivals.

The concentration of Conservative party support in the Prairies is a big part of that party’s problem. It masks a less-than-optimal performance in the larger voting markets of central Canada. But other factors are also in play.

The competition for government remains a two-way battle between the Liberals and the Conservatives.

In the past, a strong NDP has tended to be a winning condition for the Conservatives. It was a key element in the majority victories of Brian Mulroney in 1988 and Stephen Harper in 2011.

In the reverse, the NDP was at low ebb for much of the Jean Chrétien decade.

Short of a dramatic shift in New Democrat fortunes Scheer will not be able to count on Jagmeet Singh to bleed the Liberals on his behalf in October.

In B.C. where the NDP elected its second-largest provincial contingent in 2015, the Green party is breathing down its neck.

In Quebec where the party under Thomas Mulcair and Jack Layton elected its largest contingent of MPs in the last two elections, the NDP is polling in single digits, and fighting for fourth place against the Greens.

Now that the Bloc Québécois has gotten its act together, non-Liberal Quebec voters are more likely to rediscover the sovereigntist party than to give Singh a second look.

The Liberals remain the dominant force in Quebec. Two recent polls — Abacus and Léger Marketing — pegged Trudeau’s lead in his home-province at more than 10 points.

At the same time, potential clouds on the Quebec/Ottawa horizon as a result of the arrival of a less Liberal-friendly provincial government have failed to materialize.

By all indications, Coalition Avenir Quebec’s François Legault is not poised to rain on the Liberals’ election parade and Trudeau is not going out of his way to give his Quebec counterpart a reason to do so.

The battle over the CAQ’s contentious securalism law seems destined to play out in the courts for the foreseeable future.

A potential federal-provincial showdown over immigration policy has at least for now been averted. Under pressure from the Quebec business community, Legault has to juggle his promise to reduce the province’s immigration intake with increasingly widespread labour shortages.

This summer saw the first test of the process put in place last spring to give the Quebec government input in the filling of Quebec vacancies on the Supreme Court.

Sources in both capitals say the prime minister’s choice of justice Nicholas Kasirer reflected the premier’s preference.

Legault may be a small-c conservative but as the premier of a province where the issue of climate change is top-of-mind he has little to gain from associating with a pro-pipeline anti-carbon tax Conservative party. The last thing the Quebec premier wants is to have to manage a pipeline backlash on the first watch in government of his party.

He has instructed his MNAs to stay out of the federal fray.

There are some bright spots in the Conservative party Quebec picture. At 24 per cent in the Léger and Abacus polls, the party’s score is eight points higher than its last election result. And the Conservatives have a fighting chance to take out their right-wing nemesis Maxime Bernier in his Beauce riding.

Harper and Chrétien secured majority governments with minimal Quebec support. But that was back in the days when a plurality of Quebecers voted for parties like the BQ or the NDP that kept the province on the sidelines of the battle between the Conservatives and the Liberals.

For the first time since the eighties Trudeau’s party is poised to enter a federal election with a solid edge on the competition in Quebec.

And if it has been possible to form a federal government without winning Quebec in the past, doing so while also losing Ontario is essentially a non-starter.

In Canada’s largest province, Scheer remains overshadowed by his cumbersome Queen’s Park ally Doug Ford. The latter’s association with the federal Conservatives is not only toxic for the former in Ontario. For worse rather than for better, Ford’s profile nationally is higher than that of the federal leader.

None of the above is meant to suggest that the Liberals have a second victory in the bag — far from it. But with the official launch of the campaign a little more than a month away the election — on balance — is again theirs to lose.

Chantal Hébert is a columnist based in Ottawa covering politics. Follow her on Twitter: @ChantalHbert


Sounds plausible. Chantal knows a thing or two.
__________________
"You never know, you know."
Freddie_Biff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 03:42 PM   #24178
Honourable Citizen
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 17,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff View Post
Sounds plausible. Chantal knows a thing or two.
Only if you think Canada has only two provinces. Ottawa and Quebec.

You will note she pretty much ignored the entire rest of the nation, an arrogance shared by the Turdites.
__________________
Ad links appearing in my posts were not placed there by me. I do not endorse any products which may be linked to my posts. Do not click on those links.

I retain all rights to photo-images I have posted on ehMac. They were posted that other members of the community could enjoy them. They may not be used or sold in any other way without my written consent.

Bill C-51 is an act of Terrorism! It cannot be fixed and should be immediately repealed!
eMacMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 07:42 PM   #24179
Honourable Citizen
 
Freddie_Biff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 4,745
Quote:
Originally Posted by eMacMan View Post
Only if you think Canada has only two provinces. Ottawa and Quebec.

You will note she pretty much ignored the entire rest of the nation, an arrogance shared by the Turdites.


Arrogant, perhaps, but true if you want to win elections. Ontario and Quebec contain more than half of Canada’s total population. You can’t win a federal election without one or both of those provinces. Alberta could be totally blue and the Liberals can easily win, as you may have noticed in 2015. Ideally you need to have some interests in common between the west and the east though.
__________________
"You never know, you know."
Freddie_Biff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13th, 2019, 08:20 PM   #24180
Honourable Citizen
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: S. Alberta
Posts: 20,378
Riddle me this, Freddie: What does that article have anything to do with Alberta separation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff View Post
Sounds plausible. Chantal knows a thing or two.
__________________
Just a meat eating, mouth-breathing, knuckle-dragging, Harley riding deplorable troglodyte peoplekind, back from a better place...

“Have no respect whatsoever for authority; forget who said it and instead look what he starts with, where he ends up, and ask yourself, is it reasonable?” —Richard Feynman

“Charm and nothing but charm at last grows a little tiresome...It's a relief then to deal with a man who isn't quite so delightful but a little more sincere.” — W. Somerset Maugham
FeXL is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
canadian political discussion


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What do people use to watermark pictures? krs Mac, iPhone, iPad and iPod Help & Troubleshooting 20 Oct 17th, 2010 10:17 PM
This Macbook is my first and last Mac, switching back Pat McCrotch Anything Mac 123 Apr 17th, 2009 10:13 AM
The Mythical Separation of Church and State in the USA zenith Everything Else, eh! 31 May 23rd, 2008 02:40 PM
Harpo's Little Dictator headspace surfaces..... MacDoc Everything Else, eh! 242 Mar 7th, 2008 02:46 PM
Moe Norman - Canadian golf legend MACSPECTRUM Everything Else, eh! 11 May 12th, 2005 05:15 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:07 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 1999 - 2012, ehMac.ca All rights reserved. ehMac is not affiliated with Apple Inc. Mac, iPod, iTunes, iPhone, Apple TV are trademarks of Apple Inc. Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2

Tribe.ca: Urban living in Toronto!