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Old Apr 3rd, 2020, 01:18 PM   #371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FeXL View Post
The F-35 Is Not Peace Through Strength, But Weakness Through Bureaucratic Misconception



Bold mine.

No such thing as a one trick pony...
Agreed.

Further to that all the eggs are in one basket. What happens when an exploit or failure happens on the F35 platform. Every branch of the military has to sideline them? And every other user (basically every western nation) too?
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Old May 12th, 2020, 03:22 PM   #372
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The Liberals are spending another $70M on a jet they don't want to want

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In case you missed it, the federal government has chosen to dedicate another $70 million to developing a jet fighter plane it doesn’t want to want.

Compared with the billions being thrown around on anything to do with the coronavirus, $70 million rates as chickenfeed. But it brings the tab for the F-35 stealth fighter jet to $541 million to date. This for a plane Stephen Harper’s Conservatives made plain was their choice for the military’s flying forces, to replace what are regularly referred to as “Canada’s aging CF-18s,” but which Liberals, when in opposition, denounced as a disaster waiting to happen, vowing to immediately cancel the contract should they ever come to power.
Bold mine.
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Old May 12th, 2020, 04:05 PM   #373
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1/ The F-35 was then, and remains today, the absolute wrong aircraft for the Canadian Air Force. That it remains a desirable choice for some simply tells us that interoperability with the US/NATO forces (essential to further the empire's expansion abroad) is more important to those folks than having an aircraft that serves Canada's domestic defence requirements of long-range, northern climate capable interceptors. But a lot of this can be traced back to the era of the Avro Arrow, and Canada's subjugation to the U.S. military industrial complex that saw our domestic manufacturing capabilities undermined and eventually dismantled under later Free Trade agreements.

2/ The Conservatives and the Liberals alike have badly mismanaged the replacement programme. Lots of blame to go around.

3/ The argument used by the government:
... paying for development means Canada qualifies for “preferential pricing” and a prime spot in the construction schedule should the jet eventually win out over rivals from Boeing and Saab. (Airbus, another potential bidder, dropped last August after deciding the cost of meeting Norad security requirements was too high.)

In addition to discounts and quick delivery — much like you’d get from Costco in return for proof of loyalty — Ottawa points out that pumping money into the F-35 means jobs for Canadians. Defence department spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier told The Canadian Press that Canada’s cut of the development pie adds up to $1.8 billion so far.
Is to a degree, valid. Not to those of us who see the F-35 as a complete boondoggle, of course. But it's an argument that can certainly be made that the investment is worth the associated benefits. And if the Conservatives come back into power and decide to sole-source Lockheed, then they're in better shape when making that purchase (anyone know if they've made any commitment on fighter jet replacements in their platform?).

4/ Canada needs to grow a pair when it comes to defence spending. Smaller countries than ours have managed to properly equip the military while not impoverishing the country. Our relationship with the USA is the fly in the ointment. We could have a coastal defence -air and sea- to be proud of, rather than these death-trap used submarines, interminable shipbuilding campaigns, and ludicrous aircraft (of all kinds) replacement projects. Step #1 is refusing to waste our resources at the behest of US military operations that are only to the detriment of Canada's national interests.
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Old May 12th, 2020, 04:35 PM   #374
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There's a good thought exercise. Once you complete Step 1, how do YOU propose to manage Canada's defence spending effectively?

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4/ Canada needs to grow a pair when it comes to defence spending. Smaller countries than ours have managed to properly equip the military while not impoverishing the country. Our relationship with the USA is the fly in the ointment. We could have a coastal defence -air and sea- to be proud of, rather than these death-trap used submarines, interminable shipbuilding campaigns, and ludicrous aircraft (of all kinds) replacement projects. Step #1 is refusing to waste our resources at the behest of US military operations that are only to the detriment of Canada's national interests.
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Old May 12th, 2020, 06:00 PM   #375
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But a lot of this can be traced back to the era of the Avro Arrow, and Canada's subjugation to the U.S. military industrial complex that saw our domestic manufacturing capabilities undermined and eventually dismantled under later Free Trade agreements.

That's one of the the biggest F*Ups that really screwed things up for Canada, PLUS the fact of losing one of the Best-Designed planes ever, that we will never recover from.




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Old Aug 1st, 2020, 06:10 PM   #376
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Boeing Shows Super Hornets Bristling With 14 Missiles In Formal Sales Pitch To Canada

Boeing has formally submitted its Block III F/A-18E/F Super Hornet to the Royal Canadian Air Force's competition to select its next fighter jet. The company also released concept art of the configuration it is pitching to the Canadians, which shows aircraft equipped with conformal fuel tanks, carrying a podded infrared search and track sensor, and armed with an impressive 12 AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles and a pair of shorter-range AIM-9X Sidewinders. Lockheed Martin is also competing with its F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and Saab has submitted its Gripen E.

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) is hoping to receive 88 new fighter jets to replace its existing CF-18A/B+ Hornets under what is officially known as the Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP). Canada's Public Services and Procurement department announced that it had received all three formal proposals on July 31, 2020. The final contract could be worth between 15 and 19 Billion Canadian dollars

* * *

Boeing, which for a time looked like it might get shut out of the Canadian fighter jet competition over a tangential trade dispute, could actually have a leg up in the competition because of its long history working with the RCAF and its CF-18A/B+ fleet. The company's offer is "leveraging existing infrastructure to drive down the long-term sustainment cost of the aircraft," Barnes, the Director of Canada Fighter Sales, added in his statement. This is true in that there is an extensive commonality between the legacy Hornet and Super Hornet that goes far beyond hardware. Training and sustainment, in particular, enjoys substantial continuity between the two types.

Still, the Super Hornet offer is likely to face significant competition for the final contract, especially from Lockheed Martin's F-35.

* * *

The concept art that Lockheed Martin released along with its proposal notably shows F-35A variants with an optional drag chute installed on top of the rear fuselage. Lockheed Martin developed this feature first for Norway's F-35As, which is intended to help with landings on runways covered in snow or ice. The RCAF similarly operates from bases in areas where these weather conditions, as well as extremely low ambient temperatures, are common.

* * *

Saab's Gripen E is certainly more of a dark horse contender. The Swedish aviation company has been promoting significant potential industrial cooperation as a key component of Gripen offers to Canada and other prospective buyers, as well.

* * *

Gripen was designed to operate highly efficiently from austere conditions by small teams in cold climates, something that Canada could find attractive.

Canadian authorities hope to pick the winner of the FFCP competition in 2022. The goal is to have the first new fighter jet touch down in the country in 2025.

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