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Macfury Sep 13th, 2017 03:44 PM

I have heard of a "trans-disabled" student who identifies as paraplegic and clumsily uses a wheelchair to manoeuvre hallways. The person is fully mobile and walks around whenever convenient. However, others are told that they must put up with this nonsense, which is not scientifically justifiable. Instead, they are forced to doff the scientific method and alter their own realities to suit the delusion.

Quote:

Originally Posted by wonderings (Post 2542969)
What do science classrooms teach these days about gender? This is a hot button topic at the moment. Science obviously has it down pretty simply with biology but that is not what the media is telling us these days.


Freddie_Biff Sep 13th, 2017 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2542937)
But telling students that "man is responsible for climate change" or "the life of a starfish i as important as that of a human" or "Christopher Columbus was an oppressive white racist" do not leave room to think--only for some to to react.



Would you even accept that man is PARTIALLY responsible for climate change? Just how absolute are your views on this?

Freddie_Biff Sep 13th, 2017 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wonderings (Post 2542969)
What do science classrooms teach these days about gender? This is a hot button topic at the moment. Science obviously has it down pretty simply with biology but that is not what the media is telling us these days.



Funny thing is, gender can actually be more fluid in other species. Take earthworms for example, who have both genitalia, but still require another earthworm to mate. Or frogs, which can change gender depending on the local environment and what's needed for the species. Gender isn't exactly as cut and dry as we assume it might be. Human hermaphrodites have always existed, for example.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

wonderings Sep 13th, 2017 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2543225)
Funny thing is, gender can actually be more fluid in other species. Take earthworms for example, who have both genitalia, but still require another earthworm to mate. Or frogs, which can change gender depending on the local environment and what's needed for the species. Gender isn't exactly as cut and dry as we assume it might be. Human hermaphrodites have always existed, for example.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Well I should have been a bit more specific, what does high school science classes teach about human gender which is not fluid... biologically speaking.

Macfury Sep 13th, 2017 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2543209)
Would you even accept that man is PARTIALLY responsible for climate change? Just how absolute are your views on this?

Yes. So are beavers when they build large dams, or zebras when they stomp on the veldt.

Freddie_Biff Sep 13th, 2017 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2543241)
Yes. So are beavers when they build large dams, or zebras when they stomp on the veldt.



Well! Macfury makes progress.

Freddie_Biff Sep 13th, 2017 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wonderings (Post 2543233)
Well I should have been a bit more specific, what does high school science classes teach about human gender which is not fluid... biologically speaking.



It may be more fluid than you think. Where do hermaphrodites fall on the male-female continuum, for example?

Macfury Sep 14th, 2017 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2543281)
Well! Macfury makes progress.

That's all you get because that's the minimal effect we have on climate. And the effect of all of the ludicrous green energy projects and carbon taxes on climate is close to zero.

Freddie_Biff Sep 14th, 2017 01:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2543377)
That's all you get because that's the minimal effect we have on climate. And the effect of all of the ludicrous green energy projects and carbon taxes on climate is close to zero.



And that's using your supersonic gut instinct I suppose. Sure do seem to be a lot of hurricanes this year though.

Macfury Sep 14th, 2017 01:22 AM

No, that's based on science. This has been an average year for number of hurricanes--unless you guess using your supersonic gut instinct.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2543393)
And that's using your supersonic gut instinct I suppose. Sure do seem to be a lot of hurricanes this year though.


CubaMark Sep 14th, 2017 11:40 AM

Seems like a good place to drop this in....

Toronto man 'angry' after learning his $8,100 master's degree that required no exams or academic work is fake

https://i.cbc.ca/1.4287375.150531657...20/erwin-1.jpg
Erwin Sniedzins doesn't trust traditional universities.

So when the Toronto business management consultant found one offering a master's degree requiring no studying, exams, or academic work — for just $8,100 — Sniedzins thought it was a school sharing his unconventional approach to education.

"I don't necessarily like to pay $30,000 to get a master's when I feel I already have the knowledge," Sniedzins said in an interview with CBC Toronto.

He said the degree issued by Kings Lake University, which he found by searching the internet, is based on his previous life experience and professional accomplishments.

Sniedzins is president and CEO of Mount Knowledge, an educational software company. In his LinkedIn profile, he is described as an "Artificial Intelligence Gamification Patent Inventor, Key Note Speaker, Professor, Author."

* * *

Sniedzins repeatedly told CBC Toronto that he never suspected a degree based on life experience that required no academic work, studying or exams could be fake as it was in line with his approach to education.

(CBC)

FeXL Sep 14th, 2017 11:43 AM

What about the dearth of land-making hurricanes the last 12 years?

If you are truly interested in the topic, head over to the GHG Thread. Very good article on hurricanes recently posted there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2543393)
Sure do seem to be a lot of hurricanes this year though.


FeXL Sep 14th, 2017 11:45 AM

I think it's fabulous. I'll just bet he's waiting for a couple cheques from Nigeria, too. :greedy:

You can't fix stupid.

Quote:

Originally Posted by CubaMark (Post 2543601)
Seems like a good place to drop this in....


screature Sep 15th, 2017 06:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr.G. (Post 2541425)
Sometimes this is true. Still, I like to give people the opportunity to make positive comments, even if they are critical comments, in all threads. It is when the comments get personal, as in "You taught 40 years????? What a dope to stick it out that long." So, we shall see who contributes to this thread and how their contributions advance the discussion about education. Paix, mon ami.

Amen!!!

screature Sep 15th, 2017 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2541505)
I would say that imbuing students with a deliberately narrow range of leftist ideology now passes for "teaching students to think."

Quote:

Originally Posted by eMacMan (Post 2541513)
I would make that any ideology. The student needs to develop the tools to chose his own vision. Anything else is essentially doing the homework for the student.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2541521)
However, today it's leftist.

Ha! When I first went to university at 16 I thought I was a conservative, then I met some pretty hot leftist young women who seemed to think I was hot as well, well one thing led to another and I bought an NDP Partyship. The first and only Partyship I have ever had (what one will do to have sex)... I think that lasted about 4 months,

Anyway it can take some time but even young people are completely capable of thinking for themselves, hormones be damned!

Dr.G. Sep 15th, 2017 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2544353)
Amen!!!

Paix, mon ami. I hope that Life is treating you well these days.

Dr.G. Sep 15th, 2017 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2544369)
Ha! When I first went to university at 16 I thought I was a conservative, then I met some pretty hot leftist young women who seemed to think I was hot as well, well one thing led to another and I bought an NDP Partyship. The first and only Partyship I have ever had (what one will do to have sex)... I think that lasted about 4 months,

Anyway it can take some time but even young people are completely capable of thinking for themselves, hormones be damned!

:clap::clap:

screature Sep 16th, 2017 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2543377)
That's all you get because that's the minimal effect we have on climate. And the effect of all of the ludicrous green energy projects and carbon taxes on climate is close to zero.

Climate change is real. It has been the case since the beginning of time, it only makes logical sense. We are definitely live during a period of climate change. Now as to whether or not we amplify those changes has yet to be proven. But definitively we are living in a period of significant climate change.

So it could be all natural, just the way things are and have always been. But things are not as "they have always been" since the industrial and technological revolutions. I cannot see how any logical person could not see that we as a species have affected the climate of the world, if anyone knows something about quantum physics to say the least.

Now as to whether or not we are taking the correct choice to alleviate the effects of climate change for OUR OWN GOOD if highly debatable. But what what I would suggest is that we not only think about our own good when we think about such matters, but we think about the good of this beautiful blue marble, like no other that we know of, floating through space and time.

Macfury Sep 16th, 2017 02:25 PM

I would argue that the records show that not even the rate of climate change is significant. Many of us were born during an unusually stable climate from 1950 through 1970.

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2544649)
Climate change is real. It has been the case since the beginning of time, it only makes logical sense. We are definitely live during a period of climate change. Now as to whether or not we amplify those changes has yet to be proven. But definitively we are living in a period of significant climate change.


Rps Sep 16th, 2017 03:32 PM

So.......as this is a thread about education......how would you teach a series on climate change......and while I believe a teacher can help inform students with an opinion......when would you draw the line on implanting your beliefs . Depending on the age of your students, many might hold your beliefs as a truth......and in many areas our views are only our views and not truths. But then again a truth today tends to be a generally accepted belief. And as history has shown, often written by the winners.

Freddie_Biff Sep 16th, 2017 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2544649)
Climate change is real. It has been the case since the beginning of time, it only makes logical sense. We are definitely live during a period of climate change. Now as to whether or not we amplify those changes has yet to be proven. But definitively we are living in a period of significant climate change.



So it could be all natural, just the way things are and have always been. But things are not as "they have always been" since the industrial and technological revolutions. I cannot see how any logical person could not see that we as a species have affected the climate of the world, if anyone knows something about quantum physics to say the least.



Now as to whether or not we are taking the correct choice to alleviate the effects of climate change for OUR OWN GOOD if highly debatable. But what what I would suggest is that we not only think about our own good when we think about such matters, but we think about the good of this beautiful blue marble, like no other that we know of, floating through space and time.



Good points, Steve, but permit me to make one observation. We also have to be careful of the "post hoc; ergo propter hoc" argument—which translates to "after this; therefore because of this." Many observable changes in climate do seem to have occurred since the Industrial Revolution, but that does not prove that the Industrial Revolution caused them. It could be a coincidence. More evidence that X causes Y would be helpful, as opposed to synchronicity type reasoning. However, it stands to reason just as a general principle that if we don't clean up after ourselves, there are consequences (smog, plastic particles in the ocean, for example). It would be best for us and for the planet to be good stewards, I would think.

FeXL Sep 16th, 2017 03:58 PM

Bring this over to the GHG thread. Let's talk about it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2544649)
But definitively we are living in a period of significant climate change.


Freddie_Biff Sep 16th, 2017 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2544705)
So.......as this is a thread about education......how would you teach a series on climate change......and while I believe a teacher can help inform students with an opinion......when would you draw the line on implanting your beliefs . Depending on the age of your students, many might hold your beliefs as a truth......and in many areas our views are only our views and not truths. But then again a truth today tends to be a generally accepted belief. And as history has shown, often written by the winners.



There is never a time when a teacher is not passing on his or her beliefs to students, even involuntarily. If you try to be objective and non-opinionated, already you are passing on the belief that objectivity is better than opinion. As far as climate change goes, the best one can do is examine as many viewpoints as possible before coming to some kind of conclusion. Most often students will parrot their parents' views, like with religion or politics, and the teacher's role (I believe) is to show that there's a bigger world out there and beliefs with which they may not yet be familiar. That in itself is also a belief, but I think it's a healthy one.

Rps Sep 16th, 2017 04:22 PM

Frank, I think this depends on the grade you teach. At lower levels students expect " an answer", at the higher levels there is room for discussion, at the highest levels we call the discussion research. MacFury and others have commented on the political slant curricula can take...climate change being one such topic. In my day it was Louis Riel, today it's climate change, tomorrow who knows.

Freddie_Biff Sep 16th, 2017 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2544753)
Frank, I think this depends on the grade you teach. At lower levels students expect " an answer", at the higher levels there is room for discussion, at the highest levels we call the discussion research. MacFury and others have commented on the political slant curricula can take...climate change being one such topic. In my day it was Louis Riel, today it's climate change, tomorrow who knows.



You're right. Was Louis Riel a traitor or a hero? Depends who's asking. I do believe, however, that the power to explore multiple viewpoints should not be limited to only higher grades. It can be simplified, of course, but children in my experience have the capacity to look at issues from more than one perspective. Heck, it might help them to understand each other better when they're older if they start looking at different points of view while they're young.

Rps Sep 16th, 2017 05:09 PM

I do not disagree...it is how it is presented. The recent elections might have generated a topic such as " is it better to be a business person or a politician as President or Prime Minister." this could have interesting discussions without political bias ( but the teacher would have to work at it ).

Freddie_Biff Sep 16th, 2017 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2544769)
I do not disagree...it is how it is presented. The recent elections might have generated a topic such as " is it better to be a business person or a politician as President or Prime Minister." this could have interesting discussions without political bias ( but the teacher would have to work at it ).



An interesting view an an interesting question. It is really difficult to be completely unbiased, and I certainly know many teachers whose views span the entire political spectrum. It would be naive to think all teachers are lefties, for example, even if our jobs are public sector. To be an unbiased mediator of discussions can be done, but it takes great vigilance.

Dr.G. Sep 16th, 2017 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2544705)
So.......as this is a thread about education......how would you teach a series on climate change......and while I believe a teacher can help inform students with an opinion......when would you draw the line on implanting your beliefs . Depending on the age of your students, many might hold your beliefs as a truth......and in many areas our views are only our views and not truths. But then again a truth today tends to be a generally accepted belief. And as history has shown, often written by the winners.

Valid points, Rp. :clap:

Dr.G. Sep 16th, 2017 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2544737)
There is never a time when a teacher is not passing on his or her beliefs to students, even involuntarily. If you try to be objective and non-opinionated, already you are passing on the belief that objectivity is better than opinion. As far as climate change goes, the best one can do is examine as many viewpoints as possible before coming to some kind of conclusion. Most often students will parrot their parents' views, like with religion or politics, and the teacher's role (I believe) is to show that there's a bigger world out there and beliefs with which they may not yet be familiar. That in itself is also a belief, but I think it's a healthy one.

Also valid points, Frank.

Dr.G. Sep 16th, 2017 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2544769)
I do not disagree...it is how it is presented. The recent elections might have generated a topic such as " is it better to be a business person or a politician as President or Prime Minister." this could have interesting discussions without political bias ( but the teacher would have to work at it ).

More valid points.

Freddie_Biff Sep 17th, 2017 03:24 PM

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/201...dd20d3cd34.jpg

Dr.G. Sep 17th, 2017 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2544985)

Have you seen the process of the new "new math"? I have tried to understand the process, but I am lost.

Freddie_Biff Sep 17th, 2017 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr.G. (Post 2545009)
Have you seen the process of the new "new math"? I have tried to understand the process, but I am lost.


You mean "discovery math"? Yeah, all I've discovered is that there were a lot of people before me who discovered and shared some pretty great shortcuts. I don't think I'd be coming up with a quadratic equation on my own.

Dr.G. Sep 17th, 2017 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddie_Biff (Post 2545017)
You mean "discovery math"? Yeah, all I've discovered is that there were a lot of people before me who discovered and shared some pretty great shortcuts. I don't think I'd be coming up with a quadratic equation on my own.

Yes, "discovery math" is now considered the new "new math". I never could do a quadratic equation in algebra, but I am able to do mental math without pencil or paper ............. or a calculator.

screature Sep 19th, 2017 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rps (Post 2541609)
The issue that I see is not ideology, I mean we all live one whether we recognise it or not, but being able to think about issues. Unfortunately from lower grades to high school students are essentially told to " listen" and when they enter college or university are expected to think......and it is a brave teacher who challenges that model. We also need to focus on core competencies...these will never change and provide a framework from which students can develop critical thinking skills to be used their entire life.

I totally agree Rps and even though I went to a Catholic High School believe I was provided that. There were only two things Catholic about the school the first was that there was a priest on staff and you could could to a mass every day at lunch time, I went a few times, it wasn't bad, aside from the Christ and God stuff it was just basic moral and ethical instruction, there certainly was no "mind control" or anything like that about it.

The second was Religion class which you could opt out of for another course in your graduating year. It was actually very good, lots of debate but little to no indoctrination. Again it was basically about morals, ethics and philosophy, not even Christianity per say.

screature Sep 19th, 2017 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Macfury (Post 2541745)
It makes it so at the three schools with which I have direct experience and at dozens of schools where others I know have direct experience.

Ok so you have direct experience with 3 schools. The rest of your post is just pure hearsay.

I will say this though, I think most teachers tend to lean to to the left because they want to help other people. People on the right, in general, seem to just want to help themselves.

So education is not a priority of those on the right because there is not much money in it until you get to be a professor and publish inflammatory and highly debatable words, then as an academic you can make some money. Go on a speaking tour, get banned by some institutions and that makes you all the the more news worthy which is good for your bottom line in the end, great free publicity.

This is what I have seen, time and time again.

FeXL Sep 19th, 2017 04:25 PM

This is the most prejudicial piece of crap I've ever seen you post on these boards.

If that's all you've seen it's time for you to get out of the big city.

Get a grip.

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2545937)
People on the right, in general, seem to just want to help themselves.

So education is not a priority of those on the right because there is not much money in it until you get to be a professor and publish inflammatory and highly debatable words, then as an academic you can make some money. Go on a speaking tour, get banned by some institutions and that makes you all the the more news worthy which is good for your bottom line in the end, great free publicity.

This is what I have seen, time and time again.


Macfury Sep 19th, 2017 04:54 PM

I think that's nonsense. They leaned to the left because they always leaned to the left and were hired by government entities who also leaned to the left in hiring and promotion. Eventually, they filter out dissent.

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2545937)
Ok so you have direct experience with 3 schools. The rest of your post is just pure hearsay.

I will say this though, I think most teachers tend to lean to to the left because they want to help other people. People on the right, in general, seem to just want to help themselves.

So education is not a priority of those on the right because there is not much money in it until you get to be a professor and publish inflammatory and highly debatable words, then as an academic you can make some money. Go on a speaking tour, get banned by some institutions and that makes you all the the more news worthy which is good for your bottom line in the end, great free publicity.

This is what I have seen, time and time again.


wonderings Sep 19th, 2017 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by screature (Post 2545937)
I will say this though, I think most teachers tend to lean to to the left because they want to help other people. People on the right, in general, seem to just want to help themselves.

So what you are saying is the left is good and the right is evil?

How about this, the right is tired of mismanegment costing billions of dollars that could actually be used to help people. Think how much more good could be done if money was handled properly and not squandered away?

How many teachers are willing to take a pay cut in order to hire more teachers so they can have the smaller class rooms they want? There is greed on both sides, none are clean of it. You can only spend so much, it is pretty basic, if you are spending more then is coming in you are going to have problems. Now if us tax payers were willing to pay more for these services that would be great, but I am guessing if you polled the country you would find the majority do not want higher taxes.

screature Sep 21st, 2017 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FeXL (Post 2545985)
This is the most prejudicial piece of crap I've ever seen you post on these boards.

If that's all you've seen it's time for you to get out of the big city.

Get a grip.

It not prejudicial at all, it is observational. There are more liberal teachers than conservative teachers especially as you go up the educational ladder, in this country at least. Maybe you should go to the big cities where their are more school's and universities than there are in small back waters and therefore more teachers on which to make such an observation.

Get a grip on what exactly, the facts, I think I have a pretty good grip on them already.


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