: Whitney Houston dead at 48


gwillikers
Feb 11th, 2012, 09:30 PM
Pop singer Whitney Houston dead at 48 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/02/11/whitney-houston-dies.html)

She was truly an amazing singer back in the day. What a sad decline though.

John Clay
Feb 11th, 2012, 09:31 PM
https://www.ehmac.ca/everything-else-eh/99266-rip-whitney-houston.html

gwillikers
Feb 11th, 2012, 09:32 PM
3 minutes

macintosh doctor
Feb 11th, 2012, 10:02 PM
It all started down hill with Bobby brown.

Dr.G.
Feb 11th, 2012, 10:08 PM
Pop singer Whitney Houston dead at 48 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/02/11/whitney-houston-dies.html)

She was truly an amazing singer back in the day. What a sad decline though.

Sad, and all too true, gw. Such a loss of a fine voice. :(

The Doug
Feb 11th, 2012, 10:47 PM
Surprising yet oddly, not completely so.

Wasn't a fan really but there's no denying her talent and powerful voice at the start of her career.

iLabmAn
Feb 11th, 2012, 11:03 PM
Oh my God.

I am in shock.

groovetube
Feb 11th, 2012, 11:30 PM
I want to say its a shock, but really, I guess it isn't. Truly very sad.

javaqueen
Feb 12th, 2012, 12:32 AM
so sad to lose such an amazing talent and i feel really sorry for her kids

KC4
Feb 12th, 2012, 01:12 PM
Another amazing voice, silenced.

Both an inspiration and a warning to many.

RIP Whitney.

macintosh doctor
Feb 12th, 2012, 01:22 PM
It started all down hill after Bobby brown.
It's his fault !
What a loss.

jamesB
Feb 12th, 2012, 05:17 PM
It's his fault !
Remember, it takes two to tango.
We all make our own decisions.

The Doug
Feb 12th, 2012, 06:05 PM
Yep. From reports it sounds like lotsa booze + prescription Xanax + soaking in the tub = accidental drowning.

jimbotelecom
Feb 12th, 2012, 07:50 PM
Gee just like Jim Morrison. At least the bathtub and booze part.

andreww
Feb 12th, 2012, 08:06 PM
I was thinking about Whitney on friday. Something to the effect of "I'm surprised that she isn't dead yet". Sorry guys, no sorrow here whatsoever. She was born with a god given gift the she let go to waste. Bobby brown might have been a bad influence, but she was too stupid to turn and walk away. Drug addicts are very aware that they are living on borrowed time. Some choose to straighten out like Ozzy, Slash, Eddie Van Halen, etc., whilst others make that choice to continue down that path. I feel sorry for her family, but she got what was coming to her.

macintosh doctor
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:16 PM
This just in :
Houston's death is still under investigation. Citing unnamed sources, celebrity news website TMZ reports that the pop diva's stylist, hairdresser and two bodyguards were present when she was pulled from a tub at the hotel.

Police have confirmed that the 48-year-old songstress was found dead in her fourth floor room late Saturday afternoon. Foul play is not suspected.

Sources told TMZ that Houston's entourage grew concerned when they realized she had been in the washroom for over an hour. Knocks on the door reportedly produced no answer from the pop star.

The site writes that the hairstylist entered the washroom and screamed upon seeing Houston whose "face was below the water and her legs were up."

fjnmusic
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:25 PM
I was thinking about Whitney on friday. Something to the effect of "I'm surprised that she isn't dead yet". Sorry guys, no sorrow here whatsoever. She was born with a god given gift the she let go to waste. Bobby brown might have been a bad influence, but she was too stupid to turn and walk away. Drug addicts are very aware that they are living on borrowed time. Some choose to straighten out like Ozzy, Slash, Eddie Van Halen, etc., whilst others make that choice to continue down that path. I feel sorry for her family, but she got what was coming to her.

Nice. I hope people say nicer things about you at your funeral.

GratuitousApplesauce
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:27 PM
I can't say I've ever been interested in Whitney Houston's music, but she had an absolutely incredible singing ability. I wonder what she could have done if she'd really applied that gift to something more challenging than somewhat stale pop diva fare.

I watched a couple of her videos today and was amazed by the power of her singing voice, especially one of her early videos from when she was just 19. Even though I've always hated that song from the Bodyguard I'd by lying to not admit that listening to her sing it does that hair-on-the-back-of-the-neck thing.

Anyway, her death yesterday made me think about how many artists and other extremely talented people are lost because they can't figure out a way to deal with their personal demons. I think it's far too easy to say "they should realize their gift and feel lucky and just get their shite together". That's far, far easier said than done.

Besides those at the upper end of the talent scale, there's everyone else, who may have more modest talents, but don't take advantage of them or never develop or fully use them. To be really honest I'd have to look back at myself and say I'm partly guilty of that. I could be doing far more with my modest abilities than I'm doing, but manage to get in my own way time and time again, for reasons that I only partly understand.

Anyway, not to say I'm sad about Ms. Houston, I don't know her nor did I ever follow her career, but I have to admit to a bit of melancholy about all the personal demons that so many people can never figure out how to address. RIP Whitney.

groovetube
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:49 PM
I was thinking about Whitney on friday. Something to the effect of "I'm surprised that she isn't dead yet". Sorry guys, no sorrow here whatsoever. She was born with a god given gift the she let go to waste. Bobby brown might have been a bad influence, but she was too stupid to turn and walk away. Drug addicts are very aware that they are living on borrowed time. Some choose to straighten out like Ozzy, Slash, Eddie Van Halen, etc., whilst others make that choice to continue down that path. I feel sorry for her family, but she got what was coming to her.

I sort of agree with not being overly surprised, though I do feel a lot of sadness at the loss. Too many people have such simplistic ideals of addicts should just um, say no or something. It's sad to lose anyone like this and see them disintegrate.

SINC
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:52 PM
So many times, users are losers. What a waste.

iLabmAn
Feb 12th, 2012, 09:58 PM
....one needs to understand that addiction is a sickness. I wonder how the people who were close to Ms. Houston feel now. Did they not see the signs? Could they not have intervened to help her out? This person has:

Homeless man with golden voice signed by Kraft for new ad - thestar.com (http://www.thestar.com/sports/basketball/article/916401--homeless-man-with-golden-voice-signed-by-kraft-for-new-ad)

He's got a THIRD chance and support.

groovetube
Feb 12th, 2012, 10:01 PM
It is indeed a sickness. Prohibition does nothing. If we only spent some of the excessive resources we spend on enforcement on treatment, maybe more would be helped.

fjnmusic
Feb 12th, 2012, 10:18 PM
Name one celebrity who ISN'T an addict of one form or another. Whitney Houston's early death is sad, and her family, friends and fans are going to miss her. She was only 48 years old. Enough moralizing already.

groovetube
Feb 12th, 2012, 10:40 PM
That's nonsense. There are plenty who aren't addicts. As far as the music industry is concerned, I've been places and can say, there are more non addicts than there are addicts. Which I'm glad for believe me, because there's nothing like travelling with a couple addicts for a few months (or a year). It's gets old fast. I've also known a few who were addicts but found recovery, and I admire them for it.

As for coke and junk, I never really knew too many actively using that were old. Ever seen an old coke addict?

Probably not.

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 12:47 AM
That's nonsense. There are plenty who aren't addicts. As far as the music industry is concerned, I've been places and can say, there are more non addicts than there are addicts. Which I'm glad for believe me, because there's nothing like travelling with a couple addicts for a few months (or a year). It's gets old fast. I've also known a few who were addicts but found recovery, and I admire them for it.

As for coke and junk, I never really knew too many actively using that were old. Ever seen an old coke addict?

Probably not.

There are all kinds of addicts, GT. Doesn't have to be just drugs or alcohol, though those ones are probably the most readily available. Even the addiction to all the attention, and the uncertainty about what to do with one's life when one has hit the where-are-they-now list, has led many celebrities down tortured paths. I'm not talking just musicians, but famous musicians. And movie and TV starts. And sports figures. And politicians. And as Wynona once said on Oprah, as soon as you think you've dealt with one addiction, you find out there's ten more lined up right behind it.

We the fans are fascinated with watching famous people suffer with the fame. We glorify them one day and vilify them the next. Give us dirty laundry.

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 01:19 AM
Hell accountants doctors ditch diggers all of them.

But not all musicians or society in general are addicts. Nonsense.

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 02:21 AM
Hell accountants doctors ditch diggers all of them.

But not all musicians or society in general are addicts. Nonsense.

Nope. Just the famous ones. At least, the most gifted and creative ones, the ones you actually hear about. Fame itself could be considered an addiction, one that many celebrities do not do so well with. Kurt Cobain couldn't handle it. I'd say Bruno Mars seems to be handling being in the public pretty well and thrives in the spotlight. Of course, he also went to jail already for drug-related issues, so he kind of underscores my point. So does Paul McCartney—ten days in that Japanese prison on account of the wonder weed. Look closely and I imagine you'll find addictions issues with nearly every famous musician. I'm not judging them for it; I just accept it as part of the artistic temperament to be this way.

andreww
Feb 13th, 2012, 07:45 AM
Nope. Just the famous ones. At least, the most gifted and creative ones, the ones you actually hear about. Fame itself could be considered an addiction, one that many celebrities do not do so well with. Kurt Cobain couldn't handle it. I'd say Bruno Mars seems to be handling being in the public pretty well and thrives in the spotlight. Of course, he also went to jail already for drug-related issues, so he kind of underscores my point. So does Paul McCartney—ten days in that Japanese prison on account of the wonder weed. Look closely and I imagine you'll find addictions issues with nearly every famous musician. I'm not judging them for it; I just accept it as part of the artistic temperament to be this way.

That's simply an excuse. I've read plenty of biography's of former rock star addicts and in pretty much every single case the drug abuse started well before the mass fame began. I believe its more a product of having money, an abundance of free time, and the boredom of living on the road. For hard rock bands it was almost expected behavior, sex, drugs, rock n roll right? Whitney probably developed a taste for coke in the excessive 80s, but I have no doubt that her relationship with Bobby Brown took that to a whole new level.

Still don't understand the amount of play this is getting on the news outlets though. Would we be showing this much adoration for a politician, doctor or lawyer who had died as a result of decades of drug abuse? On the contrary there would be scandal and outrage. Seems we can forgive anything that our performers do so long as they produce. Dance monkey dance!

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 08:49 AM
That's simply an excuse. I've read plenty of biography's of former rock star addicts and in pretty much every single case the drug abuse started well before the mass fame began...

Thank you for helping to make the point. If they weren't famous, of course, they wouldn't have biographies written about them.

It makes sense that the addictions predate the fame. Many of the finest are also perfectionists at what they do. This perfectionism is often reflected in the madness/genius fine line many of these people walk. I'm not saying the addictions issues are the result of the fame; it's often that hard-driving obsession with their craft that makes them famous in the first place. It's life in the fast lane, man. Everything, all the time.

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 09:55 AM
Nope. Just the famous ones. At least, the most gifted and creative ones, the ones you actually hear about. Fame itself could be considered an addiction, one that many celebrities do not do so well with. Kurt Cobain couldn't handle it. I'd say Bruno Mars seems to be handling being in the public pretty well and thrives in the spotlight. Of course, he also went to jail already for drug-related issues, so he kind of underscores my point. So does Paul McCartney—ten days in that Japanese prison on account of the wonder weed. Look closely and I imagine you'll find addictions issues with nearly every famous musician. I'm not judging them for it; I just accept it as part of the artistic temperament to be this way.

Just... the famous ones? Jealous of fame much? That's moronic. Addictions hits all people and whether or not you're famous or not has absolutely nothing to do with it. Me thinks you read those tabloid sites a wee too much...

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 10:36 AM
Just... the famous ones? Jealous of fame much? That's moronic. Addictions hits all people and whether or not you're famous or not has absolutely nothing to do with it. Me thinks you read those tabloid sites a wee too much...

Not really. I just listen to the testimonies of celebrities, particularly musicians. Seems to be a pretty common pattern, especially among the most creative ones. I'd use the words "mental illness" instead, but "addictions" just sounds cooler, the same way "rehab" sounds nicer than "mental hospital." But this is exactly what we're talking about for many such famous individuals. And the "artistic temperament" (my preferred term) has addiction as one of its most common characteristics.

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 11:04 AM
Not really. I just listen to the testimonies of celebrities, particularly musicians. Seems to be a pretty common pattern, especially among the most creative ones. I'd use the words "mental illness" instead, but "addictions" just sounds cooler, the same way "rehab" sounds nicer than "mental hospital." But this is exactly what we're talking about for many such famous individuals. And the "artistic temperament" (my preferred term) has addiction as one of its most common characteristics.

artistic temperament? Nonsense. There are many artistic people who aren't addicts.

The disease of addiction doesn't care whether you are artistic or not. It's just that you tend to read more about the ones in public view more, that's all.

andreww
Feb 13th, 2012, 11:52 AM
Having a major cocaine habit is an expensive endeavour. So either you are famous and wealthy, or you are a criminal that steals in order to get a fix. Anybody in between does not last long because they usually cannot maintain employment while being a chronic user. Superstars like Huston have unlimited funds and their working environment tends to put up with that kind of behaviour. Simple as that.

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 11:55 AM
Having a major cocaine habit is an expensive endeavour. So either you are famous and wealthy, or you are a criminal that steals in order to get a fix. Anybody in between does not last long because they usually cannot maintain employment while being a chronic user. Superstars like Huston have unlimited funds and their working environment tends to put up with that kind of behaviour. Simple as that.

very true.

The Doug
Feb 13th, 2012, 12:09 PM
...Superstars like Huston have unlimited funds...

I thought she was bordering on broke at the time of her death.

andreww
Feb 13th, 2012, 12:38 PM
I thought she was bordering on broke at the time of her death.

Broke for a celebrity is probably a lot different than for you and I. I'm sure those royalty cheques were still rolling in pretty regularly.

ehMax
Feb 13th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Addiction can hit ANYONE, and the addiction can be anything to help sooth a problem. People become addicted to alcohol, weed, food, cocaine, you name it. It's very sad, but even more sad the way some of the holier-than-thows just write off such a talented life because of her addiction.

My heart goes out to people with harmful addictions. It is really shocking just how randomly this can hit people you would never expect, not just hollywood celebrities. Two instances in the last little bit really hit me.

Just today I read about Paul James (http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120213/paul-james-e-book-published-120213/#ixzz1mHE3VckE), who is big in the Canadian Soccer scene:

Hall of Fame player. World Cup veteran. Former NCAA, university, club and Canadian under-20 coach. TV and newspaper analyst.

Paul James's soccer pedigree is long and distinguished.

But away from the pitch, James lived a secret hell. For more than a decade, the intense, meticulous coach was a crack cocaine addict who lived in fear that his secret might leak out.

"In spite of losing so much -- including my soccer employment, my financial security, and, many times over, my dignity -- I appreciate that I should take comfort from the fact in 2012, I am indeed fortunate to be alive," writes James.

"For me, drug addiction has proven to be a cruel disease with no simple remedy -- not a moral failing or a weakness of mind, but a unique, personal, and devastating experience," he writes.

His double life will come as a shock to many (I have known James for more than a decade, having covered him as a coach and worked with him both as an editor and fellow TV analyst, and never suspected).

"Everybody has said that to me. Anyone that I've opened up (to) has been stunned and shocked," he said in an interview. "It's not a badge of honour to wear but what it is, it's to alert people and society in general that you never know what's going on behind closed doors."


I met Paul James several times, and he is one of the last person's on earth you'd imagine to have a drug problem.

Maybe even closer to the last person, is someone else I knew and met quite a few times (And sold Macs to on a number of occasions) :

Robert Munsch admits cocaine, alcohol addiction (http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/810365--robert-munsch-admits-cocaine-alcohol-addiction)

For more than 30 years, Robert Munsch has fascinated young readers with his unique stories that have made his books staples of any child's library.

But it is his latest story, one of admission to cocaine and alcohol addictions, that has become the most shocking and captivating one, a story not intended for his young "Munschkin" fans.

In a message titled "Note to Parents" posted on his website, the bestselling author admits he's been diagnosed as obsessive-compulsive and manic-depressive.

"Those challenges have led me to make some big mistakes," Munch says, without providing further details.

But in an interview with Global Television aired Saturday, Munsch admitted he is a recovering cocaine addict and alcoholic, adding he has been clean for about four months.

The stigma that so many people put on this problem is a major reason so many people don't get help like Paul James and Robert Munsch.

MLeh
Feb 13th, 2012, 02:03 PM
Addiction can hit ANYONE, and the addiction can be anything to help sooth a problem. People become addicted to alcohol, weed, food, cocaine, you name it. It's very sad, but even more sad the way some of the holier-than-thows just write off such a talented life because of her addiction.

My heart goes out to people with harmful addictions. It is really shocking just how randomly this can hit people you would never expect, not just hollywood celebrities.
<snip>
The stigma that so many people put on this problem is a major reason so many people don't get help like Paul James and Robert Munsch.

Thanks for writing that.

kps
Feb 13th, 2012, 02:22 PM
Whatever demons she might have been fighting doesn't diminish her talent or accomplishments.

R.I.P Whitney

javaqueen
Feb 13th, 2012, 02:32 PM
whatever demons she might have been fighting doesn't diminish her talent or accomplishments.

R.i.p whitney

+1

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 02:40 PM
addiction can hit anyone, and the addiction can be anything to help sooth a problem. People become addicted to alcohol, weed, food, cocaine, you name it. It's very sad, but even more sad the way some of the holier-than-thows just write off such a talented life because of her addiction.

My heart goes out to people with harmful addictions. It is really shocking just how randomly this can hit people you would never expect, not just hollywood celebrities. Two instances in the last little bit really hit me.

Just today i read about paul james (http://www.ctv.ca/ctvnews/canada/20120213/paul-james-e-book-published-120213/#ixzz1mhe3vcke), who is big in the canadian soccer scene:





I met paul james several times, and he is one of the last person's on earth you'd imagine to have a drug problem.

Maybe even closer to the last person, is someone else i knew and met quite a few times (and sold macs to on a number of occasions) :

robert munsch admits cocaine, alcohol addiction (http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/810365--robert-munsch-admits-cocaine-alcohol-addiction)



the stigma that so many people put on this problem is a major reason so many people don't get help like paul james and robert munsch.

+1

Mythtaken
Feb 13th, 2012, 03:28 PM
You live stupid, you die stupid.

She had every advantage and every option available to change her life. Maybe her public death will serve to help someone get smart.

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 04:16 PM
Addiction can hit ANYONE, and the addiction can be anything to help sooth a problem. People become addicted to alcohol, weed, food, cocaine, you name it. It's very sad, but even more sad the way some of the holier-than-thows just write off such a talented life because of her addiction.

My heart goes out to people with harmful addictions. It is really shocking just how randomly this can hit people you would never expect, not just hollywood celebrities. Two instances in the last little bit really hit me.

Just today I read about Paul James (http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120213/paul-james-e-book-published-120213/#ixzz1mHE3VckE), who is big in the Canadian Soccer scene:





I met Paul James several times, and he is one of the last person's on earth you'd imagine to have a drug problem.

Maybe even closer to the last person, is someone else I knew and met quite a few times (And sold Macs to on a number of occasions) :

Robert Munsch admits cocaine, alcohol addiction (http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/810365--robert-munsch-admits-cocaine-alcohol-addiction)



The stigma that so many people put on this problem is a major reason so many people don't get help like Paul James and Robert Munsch.

You speak truth, Mr. Mayor. I've studied this subject a fair bit. An addiction, whether it be to drugs, alcohol, sex, food, hoarding, or other activity that can be harmful when it becomes obsessive, is often the outward symptom of a much bigger underlying problem, often depression or manic depression (bipolar illness). A number of musicians have actually sang about it quite bluntly, including Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Billy Joel and Sting. Others have talked about it with Oprah Winfrey or other hosts. I'm fairly certain that Whitney Houston struggled with depression even as she became a successful singer in her teens, and she certainly could not use pills or alcohol to make the illness go away completely. She was reported to have taken Lorazepam (an anti-anxiety med) before taking her final bath. It is not known whether her drowning was accidental or on purpose at the time, but she was found with her head submerged and feet up. It seems very likely that depression may have been the real demon she was fighting, which showed itself as drug abuse.

Robert Munsch and Whitney Houston are certainly not alone in dealing with mental illness while living in the public eye, and they are in good company.

Famous People with Bipolar Disorder (http://www.mental-health-today.com/bp/famous_people.htm)

10 Famous People With Bipolar Disorder - Bipolar Disorder Center - Everyday Health (http://www.everydayhealth.com/bipolar-disorder-pictures/famous-people-with-bipolar-disorder.aspx#/slide-1)

Famous Bipolar People (http://www.bipolarsupport.org/famous.html)

It should be noted that not everyone with a mental illness is incapacitated by it, and that not everyone with a mental illness is famous. Likewise, not all famous people are mentally ill and, as with addictions, many function well between "episodes." Some actors, such as Jim Carrey and Robin Williams, even work their manic energy into their performances, and some, such as Sheryl Crow, work it into their music. Though not all people with addiction issues are mentally ill, virtually all famous (and non-famous) bipolar people, for example, present with addictions issues of one sort or another.

What disturbs me when I read many of the responses to Whitney Houston's death is just how callous some people can be, as though the presence of drugs or alcohol at her time of death means we shouldn't have any sympathy for her or that she got what she deserved. She was a beautiful person who was a very talented singer, who obviously had major health problems, and who died too young. She will be missed by het family, friends and fans everywhere.

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 04:32 PM
I've not only studied it, but I lived that living hell personally. What you are talking about are people using drugs to 'numb the pain', to generalize a bit. Using drugs, is indeed a symptom of the disease. Too often people make sweeping generalizations about who and why when it comes to drug addiction, and when something like this occurs, I've seen too often people make unthinking statements like, well that person had it all and blew it all up their nose. So I have no sympathy. They just don't get it.

As ehmax said, it can strike anyone, but all too often, we just read about the famous ones. But there are many famous people who are not addicts, and just because you're famous doesn't mean you're addicted to it. And, we don't tend to hear much about the vast numbers of regular people, who succumb everyday to this disease.

fjnmusic
Feb 13th, 2012, 04:36 PM
I've not only studied it, but I lived that living hell personally. What you are talking about are people using drugs to 'numb the pain', to generalize a bit. Using drugs, is indeed a symptom of the disease. Too often people make sweeping generalizations about who and why when it comes to drug addiction, and when something like this occurs, I've seen too often people make unthinking statements like, well that person had it all and blew it all up their nose. So I have no sympathy. They just don't get it.

As ehmax said, it can strike anyone, but all too often, we just read about the famous ones. But there are many famous people who are not addicts, and just because you're famous doesn't mean you're addicted to it. And, we don't tend to hear much about the vast numbers of regular people, who succumb everyday to this disease.

Agreed. And I too know of what I speak. Intimately. There are many non-famous people whose lives are ruined by mental illness, and there are others who have learned to adapt to it, not necessarily to embrace it, but to accept it in their lives and deal. As Rafiki once said, "You can run from it…or you can learn from it."

groovetube
Feb 13th, 2012, 05:07 PM
Agreed. And I too know of what I speak. Intimately. There are many non-famous people whose lives are ruined by mental illness, and there are others who have learned to adapt to it, not necessarily to embrace it, but to accept it in their lives and deal. As Rafiki once said, "You can run from it…or you can learn from it."

go it ;)

Though I'm not sure of the correlation to mental illness, there are a significant number of addicts who turn to numb their pain who aren't necessarily mentally ill. I certainly wasn't (though I did wonder a lot of the time), but there are a great number of reasons and circumstances beyond mental illnesses, (which is one of them for sure) that lead to drug abuse.

My saying often has been, everytime I turn around, there I am.

Lawrence
Feb 13th, 2012, 05:16 PM
All my friends are dead, I'm the only survivor of the 70's,
Blame it on Art school I guess, That and seeing wide.