: Defective Superdrive and Applecare


Dennis Nedry
May 10th, 2011, 11:00 PM
[deleted]

John Clay
May 10th, 2011, 11:09 PM
Call Apple, describe the problem and get them to confirm the diagnosis. Then request an on-site repair, as per your AppleCare agreement. The local AASP will then contact you to schedule a time for the repair, at your home/office.

eMacMan
May 10th, 2011, 11:10 PM
How difficult would it be to remove the HDs altogether and install a virgin drive with just the OS on it?

Does seem like the easiest way and the extra drive will almost certainly be needed in the future.

That way your drives and data stay intact.

Jason H
May 10th, 2011, 11:11 PM
Call Apple, describe the problem and get them to confirm the diagnosis. Then request an on-site repair, as per your AppleCare agreement. The local AASP will then contact you to schedule a time for the repair, at your home/office.

Exactly. Onsite repair.. Plus you don't need to give anyone the password for your account just create another admin account for service

John Clay
May 10th, 2011, 11:12 PM
Exactly. Onsite repair.. Plus you don't need to give anyone the password for your account just create another admin account for service

That doesn't really help with security; any admin account can reset the password of another account, not to mention it's easy to bypass all security with physical access.

Jason H
May 10th, 2011, 11:23 PM
That doesn't really help with security; any admin account can reset the password of another account, not to mention it's easy to bypass all security with physical access.

Well then better pour water all over it. I'm out of ideas. It was better than nothing, especially if the same password was used elsewhere.

Dennis Nedry
May 10th, 2011, 11:24 PM
[deleted]

John Clay
May 10th, 2011, 11:29 PM
Not difficult at all, except I don't actually have any spare drives kicking around. All our systems run stock Apple HD's, mostly so I can complain to Apple when they conk out under the Applecare warranty, and not the HD manufacture.



Huh?

Really?

I've never heard of on-site service from Apple before. Then again, I've never had any issues with my desktop computers until now (just some laptop issues)...

Anyways, thanks for your help. I guess I have good reason to expect that they should be able to mail me the drive, or alternatively, send someone out to fix it.

Cheers,
-DN

All desktop Macs are entitled to second business day on-site repairs, as long as you're within a certain radius from an AASP.

pm-r
May 11th, 2011, 01:44 AM
Dennis, I can't think of ONE single Victoria Apple Qualified Mac tech that would have either the inclination nor the time to go 'snooping' for any personal data you have on your big $$$ Mac if that's your concern!!

There's also a very good chance that they would just setup a new admin account user to do any tests etc. if that was even needed, and/or use other methods that would still leave your data safe and private.

I can personally vouch for Anton and/or Clayton at Byte Computers on Williams St off Esquimalt Rd and their integrity as well as their excellent Apple Mac support and experience.

Give them a call and if needed let them know that Patrick M-R recommended them, but I can guarantee you that you should NOT have any qualms of any sort using either of them and their excellent Mac expertise and I'd be very surprised if they can't get your problem sorted out and resolved, and I'd suggest, probably well beyond your expectations.

PM me if you need more info or help. Brentwood Bay isn't too far away from you!!! ;-)

broad
May 11th, 2011, 10:17 AM
Dennis, I can't think of ONE single Victoria Apple Qualified Mac tech that would have either the inclination nor the time to go 'snooping' for any personal data you have on your big $$$ Mac if that's your concern!!


amazingly enough you are correct

generally speaking the people who are working on your computer don't care whats on your computer. you arent that interesting, trust me. i dont mean you personally dennis, i mean "you" as the computing public.

that said, if you cant arrange onsite service for whatever reason just pull the drives and take the machine in. any tech with 1/8th of a brain is going to boot the machine from his own OS anyway so just help them by eliminating a step.

Kosh
May 11th, 2011, 12:12 PM
I would have said the same thing as you guys, but it depends on what type of data he has on there. Maybe he has some sensitive or classified research data, or worse he has some client data on there. If he has a small business, and he has client data on that machine, he has the responsibility to make sure he protects it.

Although, I agree with you guys that what techies have time to look at the data on the machine, I've seen some TV reports to suggest otherwise.


that said, if you cant arrange onsite service for whatever reason just pull the drives and take the machine in. any tech with 1/8th of a brain is going to boot the machine from his own OS anyway so just help them by eliminating a step.

That's a good point. You could just take out all the drives. Any tech place can place in their own drive or start the machine from the optical drive.

Dennis Nedry
May 11th, 2011, 07:18 PM
[deleted]

John Clay
May 11th, 2011, 08:38 PM
Did you specifically request onsite service? The front line CSRs will never offer it, and will sometimes try and get around it by having you bring it in. I've had to be firm in the past, speaking to a supervisor on one occasion.

Paddy
May 11th, 2011, 09:29 PM
Denis, if replacing the drive yourself is easier (and perhaps cheaper, when you consider the cost of your time dealing with the repair under warranty) then I'd be inclined to just do it. It's very easy.

Couldn't find that particular model of drive in Canada, but here's a well-reviewed alternative:

Newegg.ca - LITE-ON Black 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA CD/DVD Burner - Bulk - CD / DVD Burners (http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=27-106-289&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Keywords=Mac&Page=1#scrollFullInfo)

$26 with shipping. :)

(Checked to see if Mac owners had installed it successfully and they have)

Apple posts the instructions for installing optical drives in the Mac Pros because (1)not all of us get extended warranties on desktops and may have to do this at some point out of the warranty period and (2)some people add a second drive later, on their own.

BTW - AppleCare warranty options are all spelled out here: http://images.apple.com/legal/applecare/docs/NA_APP_English_v5.3.pdf - see 1.c (ii) for the bit about onsite service.

mguertin
May 11th, 2011, 09:55 PM
Dennis: I'd honestly just replace it yourself with a $30 drive. Probably a lot less hassle.

The superdrive in my MBP died last night ... sucks .. I think it might have been used a total of 8 times ever. I'm out of warranty as I missed buying the extended warranty in time so not going to spend any $$ on it, certainly not for the Apple replacement parts (robbery) and even 3rd party ones are just not worth it for me. I carry an external USB dvd drive in my laptop bag for work purposes anyway ;)

pm-r
May 11th, 2011, 10:24 PM
Dennis, you are trying the *same* known good or commercial CD/DVD disk in each drive when testing the "jackhammer" sound aren't you and not using a disk with an improperly applied stick-on label that can throw the optical drive out of balance???

Dennis Nedry
May 11th, 2011, 11:36 PM
[deleted]

pm-r
May 12th, 2011, 01:37 AM
I'm actually probably going to do this. The LG GH41N is a brutally cheap drive, and frankly, I think it's embarrassing to see such a cheap piece of crap sitting in such a nice machine.

My old 2006 Mac Pro had a nice pair of Pioneer drives in it (DVR-112Ds, Apple branded) and they were not only infinitely quieter, but *faster*. Yes, you read that right. Installing SC2 on my 2006 Mac Pro took less then 10 minutes. It takes over 45 minutes to install on my 2010 Mac Pro, because the GH41N is so bloody slow at moving data.

That being said, I'm probably going to just order a pair of DVR-219L's. They're about $35.99/piece, and I'll probably swap out both drives.
... ... ...
Frankly, coupled with the crappy read performance and quality of these things, I think it's just better to replace them. I'm still not happy that this is what passes for quality these days at Apple, considering what they used to use in their former Mac Pro systems.
-DN


That's probably an excellent decision Dennis as you probably wouldn't have much choice as to what replacement drives Apple may actually supply as a replacement under your warranty - if they would even be covered for the problem.

And I agree with your comments on the quietness and speed of the older Pioneer drives and it is the same that I have experienced with such double optical drives in our G4 MDD.

Maybe some of the experts could post their comments and recommendations as to the best replacement drive brand and model that's available these days for your and other's similar Mac Pro model???

Dennis Nedry
May 12th, 2011, 04:24 AM
[deleted]

monokitty
May 12th, 2011, 10:24 AM
Warranty replacement parts are like-for-like - you would not receive a new and improved optical drive. So if you're not happy with OEM, buy your own aftermarket drives.

pm-r
May 12th, 2011, 01:47 PM
Warranty replacement parts are like-for-like - you would not receive a new and improved optical drive. So if you're not happy with OEM, buy your own aftermarket drives.

That seems to be the case - until they run out of stock I guess as some users received an updated model for their noisy or kaput GH41N according to some on the discussion lists.

So even then, one can't always guarantee what replacement drive or model you'd get via Apple, so spending $70.00 for two good Pioneer drives of one's choice would sure seem to be the better route to go.