: Kijiji, Craigslist, eBay, ehMac, etc, which is your favorite?


screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 11:12 AM
Just curious as to what online classified source for buying and selling things is preferred by ehMacers. I have used them all for buying and selling (including the classifieds here) and have had generally really good experiences with them all.

I would have to say my personal favourite is Kijiji because of the local sale aspect and unlike Craigslist there is a photo of what you are interested in right off the top. The classifieds here would come in second with ebay and Craigslist pulling up the rear.

Thoughts and experiences?

knightwrangler
Jun 19th, 2010, 11:20 AM
Red flag deals which I believe is affiliated with ehmac.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 11:29 AM
Red flag deals which I believe is affiliated with ehmac.

Isn't Red Flag Deals just for new merchandise or can you buy used merchandise as well?

knightwrangler
Jun 19th, 2010, 11:35 AM
New, used, and members post any good deals they see on new merchandise.
Plus it has user feedback section in which Kijiji doesn't.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 11:42 AM
New, used, and members post any good deals they see on new merchandise.
Plus it has user feedback section in which Kijiji doesn't.

Good to know I will have to check out the used section.

bsenka
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:07 PM
eBay is my main go-to when shopping, Amazon is second. I don't really use much else, not even for local sales. I avoid Kijiji and cragslist particularly. I'm not really comfortable with the whole going to someone's house thing. I much prefer to just pay for it online and have it delivered to me.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:12 PM
eBay is my main go-to when shopping, Amazon is second. I don't really use much else, not even for local sales. I avoid Kijiji and cragslist particularly. I'm not really comfortable with the whole going to someone's house thing. I much prefer to just pay for it online and have it delivered to me.

Interesting. To each their own. I prefer a face to face meeting and trust a completely anonymous transaction and hoping that I really get what I am paying for a lot less. I also like being able to physically inspect the item before paying so that if it doesn't meet with my expectations I can back out of the deal.

knightwrangler
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:12 PM
Never meet at someone's house if possible go to a public place like Tim Horton's.

knightwrangler
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:14 PM
I've done both the face to face meeting and I have shipped items out to different provinces. Both work well and the shipping out is more convenient for both parties.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:21 PM
Never meet at someone's house if possible go to a public place like Tim Horton's.

I've had people to the house and been at other people's homes as well as having met in public places. Never been a problem in any way. I think you have to have you use your instincts when it comes to meeting people. If the e-mail exchanges don't feel right then back away.

Shipping is good as well. I have shipped and received stuff. To me there are two down sides to shipping, cost and lack of pre-purchase inspection. That being said I have never received anything that was shipped to me that I felt the need to return or that I had been ripped off, but the potential for it is of course always there.

knightwrangler
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:28 PM
I think you have to have you use your instincts when it comes to meeting people. If the e-mail exchanges don't feel right then back away.

To me there are two down sides to shipping, cost and lack of pre-purchase inspection. That being said I have never received anything that was shipped to me that I felt the need to return or that I had been ripped off, but the potential for it is of course always there.

+1 Take proper precautions and as screature wrote basically trust your instincts...

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 01:07 PM
By and large the merchandise here on EhMac is offered at premium prices, but I prefer to deal with people from here when the price is reasonable. Craigslist has a big enough pool of merchandise that prices begin to approach what I consider to be realistic.

maxipad
Jun 19th, 2010, 01:51 PM
Kijiji and craigslist only work good in big cities and there are quite a few flakes and scams. Both of these sites are OK but when you start to scroll through and really investigate the ads you will find spammers and small stores posing as 5 different people.

Redflagdeals is an absolute dump. I've never met a worse crowd in my life, the buyers are the cheapest people alive. The selling is controlled by a couple of major spammers using different accounts. Even though they say no commercial sellers allowed.

All these sites can be good if you do the research and find the right deal , but they are all plagued by the same problem. Spammers and posers. Just take a look at the toronto craigslist, there is this one spammer from yonge and finch who is a dealer and sometimes posts 40 ads at a time, there is another store in markham and missisauga that keep on spamming the toronto section every 45 minutes to stay on top, there is just no moderation or enforcement of any kind. You can not scroll 10 ads on the craigslist without finding the guy that sells the pirated software. I recently looked in "view other items" of a seller on kijiji, he had about 130 pages of the same ad for pirated windows 7. Any site that pools together hookers, 420 sellers and counterfeit sales is a dump in my mind.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 01:59 PM
maxipad: agreed that craigslist is crook and SPAM city. There's a moron who has been trying to sell the same 25 or 30 books for over two years at the same price and he rotates new ads for them every day or two. If he worked a real job instead for an hour, he'd be ahead of the game. There's the Chinese site offering new MacBooks for $277. There's the guy who is called out daily for selling hideous garbage as "original Art Deco." The "Windows 7" guy. And the people who post an item, wait for offers, then relist it at a higher price over months and weeks. Although craigs allows users to police the site by killing offensive ads, the number is now overwhelming.

That said, my eyes mostly gloss over the SPAM ads now. It's as if though they all speak the same language and their ads give off a certain offensive aroma that marks them.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:06 PM
Tis true... But there are also some really good buys to be had. It takes effort, checking back frequently, good communication etc., and knowing that if something sounds too good to be true, then it is.

Caveat emptor is always the rule with any of these sites as in purchasing in general. PT Barnum said it best, "There's a sucker born every minute." So in the end if you get suckered you have no body to blame but yourself. Education is the best defence against being a sucker.

bsenka
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:09 PM
Interesting. To each their own. I prefer a face to face meeting and trust a completely anonymous transaction and hoping that I really get what I am paying for a lot less. I also like being able to physically inspect the item before paying so that if it doesn't meet with my expectations I can back out of the deal.

From what I've seen, It's those face to face transactions that have the highest chance of going really wrong. I've seen a lot of these kinds of stories lately:
Dad shot dead after placing Craigslist ad - TODAY (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/37082569/)

I'm specifically staying away from those situations. To me, the fact that the seller (or the buyer) is using craigslist or kijiji rather than ebay is a huge red flag all by itself that they may not be on the level.

I know people who have been burned in the neutral site face to face transactions too. The seller had some elaborate story and the buyer somehow ended up paying for and leaving with a product that was not the one they inspected. And, of course the scammer is now gone and nowhere to be found. As much as we all would like to think we're smart enough not to get taken that way, it happens.

Ebay and Amazon back up their users transactions. In as much as some people have had issues with the eBay and Paypal dispute mechanisms, at least they HAVE dispute mechanisms. If a seller sends you a defective product and refuses to make it right, you can rescind payment. (I've done it, it works). Plus, the feedback is there so you can see a track record of how the person conducts their business. Even better, ebay never sleeps. I work nights, and I can make the transactions any time and not have to worry about finding time to meet up.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:12 PM
From what I've seen, It's those face to face transactions that have the highest chance of going really wrong. I've seen a lot of these kinds of stories lately:
Dad shot dead after placing Craigslist ad - TODAY (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/37082569/)

I'm specifically staying away from those situations. To me, the fact that the seller (or the buyer) is using craigslist or kijiji rather than ebay is a huge red flag all by itself that they may not be on the level.

I know people who have been burned in the neutral site face to face transactions too. The seller had some elaborate story and the buyer somehow ended up paying for and leaving with a product that was not the one they inspected. And, of course the scammer is now gone and nowhere to be found. As much as we all would like to think we're smart enough not to get taken that way, it happens.

Ebay and Amazon back up their users transactions. In as much as some people have had issues with the eBay and Paypal dispute mechanisms, at least they HAVE dispute mechanisms. If a seller sends you a defective product and refuses to make it right, you can rescind payment. (I've done it, it works). Plus, the feedback is there so you can see a track record of how the person conducts their business. Even better, ebay never sleeps. I work nights, and I can make the transactions any time and not have to worry about finding time to meet up.

YMWV. ;) There are unscrupulous people/businesses every where.

This is indeed a tragic story, but going this route for a sale was a HUGE mistake, basically advertising, "we have cash come and get it" to unscrupulous characters. Very sad but regrettably extremely naive on the part of the seller.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:13 PM
I would never give out my address for selling something like jewelry, nor would I offer it on craigslist. The outcome would have been the same if the ad had been placed in the newspaper classifieds. It has nothing to do with craigslist.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:27 PM
.....

bsenka
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:28 PM
I would never give out my address for selling something like jewelry, nor would I offer it on craigslist. The outcome would have been the same if the ad had been placed in the newspaper classifieds. It has nothing to do with craigslist.

But on ebay, it would have been completely avoided. Seller gets his money first, then sends out the product. No face to face = no scariness.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:31 PM
But on ebay, it would have been completely avoided. Seller gets his money first, then sends out the product. No face to face = no scariness.

Well not no scariness, you can still be ripped off, but agreed, certainly not of the kind you referenced.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:31 PM
Misplaced post

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:32 PM
Happy that we have Nobel Prize winners on Barry's team, thinkin' this through for the folks in Louisiana, whilke the Coast Guard is shutting down skimmers.

I think you posted this to the wrong thread MF, unless I am missing something? :confused:

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:32 PM
I think you posted this to the wrong thread MF, unless I am missing something? :confused:


No, I posted it in the right thread, but it jumped. A second one did as well. Will correct it.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:33 PM
Barry is afraid to offend the unions so he won't allow skimmers from other countries to assist in the oil spill clean-up:

The President Does a Jones Act - WSJ.com (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704324304575306881766723718.html?m od=WSJ_hpp_sections_opinion)

Still posting to the wrong thread MF.

Edit: Ok... how does a post "jump" threads?

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:35 PM
Edit: Ok... how does a post "jump" threads?

Not sure what is happening. I literally picked them up and copied them to the right thread instead.

bsenka
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:38 PM
Well not no scariness, you can still be ripped off, but agreed, certainly not of the kind you referenced.

But you're far less likely to get ripped off because of the feedback and dispute resolution mechanisms.

lara
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:47 PM
I saw an ad on CL for an expansive lens offered at a great discount. To me, that's a red flag. Then it gets better. The seller "suggested" that buyers can bring their cameras and a computer to the meeting to test the lens. Maybe it's just me, but I smell a rat.

L

lara
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:49 PM
Regarding ehMac's classified, is it just me, or did things slow down once However stopped administrating that part of ehMac?

L

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:55 PM
But you're far less likely to get ripped off because of the feedback and dispute resolution mechanisms.

Well as a seller you can be still ripped off if using PayPal through reverse payment fraud.

But eBay's Feedback system is quite good. I use eBay as well. I think one of the things worth mentioning in face-to-face meetings is that if you are meeting someone in their home/having them come to your's, make sure the item isn't worth more than a couple of hundred dollars and you will greatly reduce your chances of running into the kind of tragic situation you highlighted.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 02:57 PM
Regarding ehMac's classified, is it just me, or did things slow down once However stopped administrating that part of ehMac?

L

It slowed down after people were discouraged from commenting on prices and merchandise. The Classifieds were a busy place when EhMacers were allowed to comment on over-pricing or allowed to point members to better deals elsewhere. Since the "no price police" policy, much of the merchandise just languishes there.

Second problem: there is no mechanism for removing ads when merchandise has been sold. Half the new messages are: "Has this been sold?"

Max
Jun 19th, 2010, 03:11 PM
I buy and sell used guitars and related gear on Craigslist. The GTA is the nation's largest market for this sort of thing so there's an incredible amount of churn. I rarely bother with online forums like this one as the pool is too small. In my Craigslist and Kijiji deals I have been to people's houses and I've had them over to mine. I've made friends via Craigslist deals, believe it or not. There are also other people with whom I have repeatedly made deals and it's always a pleasure to do business with someone with whom you already have an established history. I have never been burned, robbed or mugged. That said, I pay attention to the other person and take it very cautiously until such time as I believe the meet can go forward. In such instances as I feel there's something hinky going on, I'll meet at a coffee shop or public square. But with electric guitars you need to be able to jack in and make sure the wiring's all up to snuff. There are even ways around that if you have the slightest suspicion someone is on the make. Where there's a will, there's a way.

Finally, I would never go buy anything off of Ebay because the kind of merchandise I am after has to be in my hands and given a good inspection and test drive, however briefly, before I commit to purchasing it. Horses for courses, etc.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 03:25 PM
...In my Craigslist and Kijiji deals I have been to people's houses and I've had them over to mine. I've made friends via Craigslist deals, believe it or not...

With the last Kijiji transaction I completed I recently received a Facebook friend request from the seller, so I know what you mean.

I think because of incidents like the one posted by bsenka (even though I am sure they are less than one in a million or more) there is an aversion for some people to make face to face transactions, which I think is sad. Face to face is the way the vast majority of financial transactions have been done for millennia.

It is sad that in an age where we live in a "global village" it has made some of us more comfortable dealing with an anonymous "entity" rather than another living breathing person right in front of us. :(

ComputerIdiot
Jun 19th, 2010, 04:00 PM
I tend to use the local Yahoo groups (niagarabuyandsell, yardsalestcatharines, StCatharinesGarageSales) to sell stuff, though I have sold a few items on the local Kijiji site.

The aggravation with any of them is when people say they will meet you and don't show up ... or want to give you a vague time like "some time this afternoon, I'm not sure exactly when." I'm currently awaiting the recipient of some books (free) and they have another 15 minutes after which I will go on about my day as originally scheduled and they will be SOL. :ptptptptp

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 04:47 PM
The aggravation with any of them is when people say they will meet you and don't show up ... or want to give you a vague time like "some time this afternoon, I'm not sure exactly when." I'm currently awaiting the recipient of some books (free) and they have another 15 minutes after which I will go on about my day as originally scheduled and they will be SOL. :ptptptptp

I tried to meet someone four times to pick up an LP. The final time he was supposed to meet me at a subway station, then e-mailed me that he was going to a club, four miles away instead--I should look for him inside.

I let it go at that point.

groovetube
Jun 19th, 2010, 04:53 PM
craigslist is great, after getting low balled here a few times I sold a computer for a reasonable price on craigslist. Seems to have worked there each time pretty well.

simon
Jun 19th, 2010, 05:51 PM
I browse through them all; Craigslist, Kijiji, Redflagdeals, ehMac, eBay (the last two not so much any more).

In the past few years I have purchased $10,000's worth of camera lenses, camera bodies, computers and more with no issues or worries of scammers or thieves (mostly from Craigslist). You just have to aware of what your are buying and the surroundings on where you are meeting. Cameras and lenses can be anywhere public - usually a Starbucks or Tim Hortons, but for computers it's always been at the seller's home or office because I need to see it work before I buy. If you are going to be nervous or always on edge because you think someone setting you to be robbed, maybe you would be better off just buying from a store.

Ask questions via email before you meet, the person selling the item is usually the person who used it. If they answer your questions quickly and accurately they are usually on the up and up. But I find the ones that are vague or don't know what you are talking about when you ask a particular features (like the lenses date code), maybe this seller has "other intentions" or by refusing to meet, only ship, they are a scam in the making, or maybe a thief trying to fence his ill-gotten gains. Learn to read the seller and you'll never have a problem.

As for eBay, that place is failing faster than me trying to learn advanced astrophyics. They day after eBay changed their rules on Seller feedback I got a negative feedback from a buyer who was looking for a "discount" on his purchase after he received the item. He demanded a 50% refund because the broken camera lens I sold was, get this, more broken than he expected. It was listed as broken, it was described as broken, and sold AS IS because it was broken. The buyer even emailed me through eBay to ask how broken it was and I answered accordingly. Because I refused to give him half his money back, he then made a claim through PayPal to get all his money back.

In the end this dick left me a nasty negative feedback, got his money back and kept the lens. After fighting with PayPal on the reversal of charges, they finally admitted that they refunded in error (because there was no proof the lens was returned - which it wasn't). So I was right - but get this, there is no means for them to get the money returned back to the buyer back to the seller. I was told to email the buyer and hopefully he would give me back the money he was "accidentally" refunded (without returning the lens), and like that's going to happen. And even after all that I can't give him a negative feedback for scamming me but his nasty negative stays on my record. I was a PowerSeller and sold everything there - no more. eBay doesn't care about their sellers as they try to make it into something it's not (Amazon), I haven't bought anything there for over a year and I refuse to sell anything on eBay ever again. eBay is sinking and sinking fast because I am not the only one they have pulled this **** on. They have lost most of the small sellers with these rule changes - these were they ones that made eBay what it was and now they just don't care.

Lastly I would like to make a comment on ehMac's Classified section. This is the place that got me hooked on buying and selling my stuff online. This was a much better solution than paying $30 to the Record's Classified section to try to sell one item (or free if the item was less than $50). This is going back more than a few years when ehMac's Buy and Sell was natural part of the ehMac community. I used it frequently and with gusto ... but alas not so much any more, there's just not enough eyeball traffic to sell here any more. I post something for sale here occasionally or when I'm looking for something Appleish. I also usually post on Craigslist at the same time, I have never sold anything through ehMac but it will sell on Craigslist. I don't get any replies for my wanted-to-buys, but I'll find it on Craigslist. And not to poo-poo the Classified too much, but the approval process is just too slow. I posted something for sale here and on Craigslist a couple months back and it sold on Craigslist before the ad was even approved and posted on ehMac.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 08:06 PM
craigslist is great, after getting low balled here a few times I sold a computer for a reasonable price on craigslist. Seems to have worked there each time pretty well.

A larger buying public for sure. I have started listing items here at a decent price, kept them up for a week or two, then sold them the next day at asking price on craigslist.

Max
Jun 19th, 2010, 08:09 PM
Well, people will often try to low-ball you on CL too. Trick is to filter that stuff out and not get yer knickers in a knot over it. Sometimes such attempts are unintentionally comical. I try to go with the flow. Someone gets too nasty, I mark 'em as spamola and move on.

Macfury
Jun 19th, 2010, 08:31 PM
The best prices are often offered by people from other countries who are selling merchandise they have left behind in your city.

screature
Jun 19th, 2010, 09:17 PM
The best prices are often offered by people from other countries who are selling merchandise they have left behind in your city.

LOL! Most of them have gone to Nigeria. ;)

Max
Jun 19th, 2010, 09:18 PM
Oh, that's true too. You only have to deal with them courteously and give them all the information they request, and then everything will be OK.

groovetube
Jun 19th, 2010, 09:34 PM
Well, people will often try to low-ball you on CL too. Trick is to filter that stuff out and not get yer knickers in a knot over it. Sometimes such attempts are unintentionally comical. I try to go with the flow. Someone gets too nasty, I mark 'em as spamola and move on.
yup, don't even reply.

Max
Jun 19th, 2010, 10:24 PM
Sometimes I have to - it's too engaging to ignore. I like to play with 'em a bit sometimes. Just to let 'em know I wasn't born yesterday (it was last week).

MACinist
Jun 20th, 2010, 01:15 AM
I've done hundreds of transactions in the past 5 years or so. Both buying and selling. I prefer in person transactions and never had any issues. I feel instinct is most important when using any kind of classified system. At the same time, I think each one has it's own product category strengths and weaknesses.

Craigslist: never really liked the layout and GUI so didn't give it a chance. There is some weird adds there. Plus tons of spam.

RedFlagDeals Classified Forum: I find they are good for selling PC Parts and components. Also gaming stuff and car parts. I find buying/selling Apple products there has always been a struggle as it typically was a PC crowd. But, slowly, there is more Mac stuff available there. Being able to bump your thread without re-posting is a plus. So is being able to leave comments (although it can get nasty at times due to immaturity). Buyer Feedback system is good as well.

eHmac: my first ever online transaction was through ehmac classifieds (the old classifieds). I loved the layout. It was simple and aesthetic like Kijiji, but also allowed for members to comment and the feedback system was great. It also got a lot of traffic at the time even though there weren't as many members as there are today. It went through it's first change and it was really bad. All previous feedback was lost. I think this is where a lot of ehmac'ers lost faith in the classifieds here. Current version is a bit better but still nothing like what it used to be. Not being able to delete your ad sucks and is frustrating as old ads are diluting the section. Plus I don't think it has recovered from the traffic downturn on it's first interface overhaul. And pricing is typically at a premium vs other outlets.

Ebay: I would never buy anything on there that is heavy, or expensive, or has any moving parts (like technology). I have bought some car parts (like spoilers and fog lights) that worked out well but they were local dealers and I ended up picking the parts up myself. I have also bought AppleCare that worked out alright even though I read after that there are some scams. However, the process is a bit complicated for new users therefore it limits an audience and sellers that don't want to pay fees.

Kijiji: as someone previously mentioned, being in the GTA is the biggest benefit of using the classifieds. The market is huge for both selling and buying. I find the best deals and most choice is on Kijiji. I like the interface there the most. Ads are easy to look for and easy to post. With the ease comes spam and retailers flooding some categories (like TV's). However, after a while you learn how to skim through them (EG. I never open ones where the price ends in 99.... as that seems to be mostly retailers). Today, this is the best place to find good deals on Mac products. It's also a decent place to sell Mac products as it gets a lot of viewers. As I said before, it reminds me a lot of the old eHmac system (minus the replies). It can be an OK CORRAL at times and there is no feedback system so basics and instinct is key. Good for car shopping. Home rentals. Mac stuff. Furniture. Gaming and other computers products.

Facebook marketplace: not mentioned but a medium that has potential. Interface is good but obviously, it's limited by it's membership and has some privacy issues.

It's tragic what happened to that family in the US. Selling things like jewellery is risky but so is iPhones and other Mac products as that seems to be as good as gold these days. There are basics one needs to follow; Ask questions. Email exchange. Phone exchange. Using your instinct when speaking to the person and bail after you get your first wiff of something weird or wrong. I look at every detail... even peoples grammer and email address. If there is any hesitation, deal in a public place like a Tim Hortons' or better yet, don't deal at all.

Low-ballers always exist when dealing privately. Everyone wants the best deal. I just learned to ignore them. I used to get really angry and responded a lot to low-ballers but it's a complete waste of time.

I have met several people during my transactions that I maintained contact with after as well. It can be a positive experience as long as you take pre-caution, cover basics and let your instincts guide you.

screature
Jun 20th, 2010, 11:42 AM
I've done hundreds of transactions in the past 5 years or so. Both buying and selling. I prefer in person transactions and never had any issues. I feel instinct is most important when using any kind of classified system. At the same time, I think each one has it's own product category strengths and weaknesses...

Great post MACinist. Pretty much matches my experiences and strategies... Go with your gut being the most important rule of thumb.

knightwrangler
Jun 20th, 2010, 12:35 PM
yup, don't even reply.

Sometimes I have to - it's too engaging to ignore. I like to play with 'em a bit sometimes. Just to let 'em know I wasn't born yesterday (it was last week).

Buyers can be so annoying, they play hard ball with you like they have a sense of entitlement.
They will lowball you and say that your price is too high without researching the market.

At that point a reply is necessary, which can escalate into a war of words.

No sale is accomplished and both buyer and seller go away mad, frustrated.

knightwrangler
Jun 20th, 2010, 12:38 PM
I've done hundreds of transactions in the past 5 years or so. Both buying and selling. I prefer in person transactions and never had any issues. I feel instinct is most important when using any kind of classified system. At the same time, I think each one has it's own product category strengths and weaknesses.

Craigslist: never really liked the layout and GUI so didn't give it a chance. There is some weird adds there. Plus tons of spam.

RedFlagDeals Classified Forum: I find they are good for selling PC Parts and components. Also gaming stuff and car parts. I find buying/selling Apple products there has always been a struggle as it typically was a PC crowd. But, slowly, there is more Mac stuff available there. Being able to bump your thread without re-posting is a plus. So is being able to leave comments (although it can get nasty at times due to immaturity). Buyer Feedback system is good as well.

eHmac: my first ever online transaction was through ehmac classifieds (the old classifieds). I loved the layout. It was simple and aesthetic like Kijiji, but also allowed for members to comment and the feedback system was great. It also got a lot of traffic at the time even though there weren't as many members as there are today. It went through it's first change and it was really bad. All previous feedback was lost. I think this is where a lot of ehmac'ers lost faith in the classifieds here. Current version is a bit better but still nothing like what it used to be. Not being able to delete your ad sucks and is frustrating as old ads are diluting the section. Plus I don't think it has recovered from the traffic downturn on it's first interface overhaul. And pricing is typically at a premium vs other outlets.

Ebay: I would never buy anything on there that is heavy, or expensive, or has any moving parts (like technology). I have bought some car parts (like spoilers and fog lights) that worked out well but they were local dealers and I ended up picking the parts up myself. I have also bought AppleCare that worked out alright even though I read after that there are some scams. However, the process is a bit complicated for new users therefore it limits an audience and sellers that don't want to pay fees.

Kijiji: as someone previously mentioned, being in the GTA is the biggest benefit of using the classifieds. The market is huge for both selling and buying. I find the best deals and most choice is on Kijiji. I like the interface there the most. Ads are easy to look for and easy to post. With the ease comes spam and retailers flooding some categories (like TV's). However, after a while you learn how to skim through them (EG. I never open ones where the price ends in 99.... as that seems to be mostly retailers). Today, this is the best place to find good deals on Mac products. It's also a decent place to sell Mac products as it gets a lot of viewers. As I said before, it reminds me a lot of the old eHmac system (minus the replies). It can be an OK CORRAL at times and there is no feedback system so basics and instinct is key. Good for car shopping. Home rentals. Mac stuff. Furniture. Gaming and other computers products.

Facebook marketplace: not mentioned but a medium that has potential. Interface is good but obviously, it's limited by it's membership and has some privacy issues.

It's tragic what happened to that family in the US. Selling things like jewellery is risky but so is iPhones and other Mac products as that seems to be as good as gold these days. There are basics one needs to follow; Ask questions. Email exchange. Phone exchange. Using your instinct when speaking to the person and bail after you get your first wiff of something weird or wrong. I look at every detail... even peoples grammer and email address. If there is any hesitation, deal in a public place like a Tim Hortons' or better yet, don't deal at all.

Low-ballers always exist when dealing privately. Everyone wants the best deal. I just learned to ignore them. I used to get really angry and responded a lot to low-ballers but it's a complete waste of time.

I have met several people during my transactions that I maintained contact with after as well. It can be a positive experience as long as you take pre-caution, cover basics and let your instincts guide you.

+1 Good advice !

bsenka
Jun 20th, 2010, 12:57 PM
YMWV.

No kidding.

I honestly think it's fascinating that when you and some of the others in this thread list what you think are the biggest weaknesses of eBay, I'm looking at those very things as it's greatest strengths. (And vice versa for craigslist/kijiji). I guess each it good at what they do IF that is what you actually want them to do.

Max
Jun 20th, 2010, 01:39 PM
Buyers can be so annoying, they play hard ball with you like they have a sense of entitlement.
They will lowball you and say that your price is too high without researching the market.

At that point a reply is necessary, which can escalate into a war of words.

No sale is accomplished and both buyer and seller go away mad, frustrated.

I've had that happen sometimes - zero sum game. Other times it's actually turned into something amicable. Usually doesn't come to an actual transaction but it needn't always be nasty or petty.

I find each deal different. You just never know.

Macfury
Jun 20th, 2010, 03:41 PM
I sold an Airport card to a guy on craigslist and ended up coaching him on his transition to Macs over the next few months.

But on all craigslist ads I begin with an anonymous e-mail address, then only gradually reveal enough about myself in subsequent e-mails to complete the transaction--if I think it's going well. A lot of the responses are phishing and they never supply any specifics about themselves while trying to get me to reveal all of my details.

MaxPower
Jun 20th, 2010, 11:07 PM
It depends what I'm selling.

Computers - ehMac. I've had some really good results here and have even made some business contacts.

Everything else - Kijiji. As soon as the ad is posted, I get replies almost immediately. Granted you have to filter out the crap. For instance I was selling a bunch of flagstone and I had the odd buyer asking if I could sell 6 pieces. I sold the flagstone the next day and we were both happy.

Don't get me started on eBay.....