: iPod transmissions from beyond iTunes


Bryce
Sep 30th, 2008, 10:29 AM
Picked up a Nano some time ago.
As with all things there are some qustions.

Have downloaded some non iTunes suggested/available programs.

I would like to listen to these on the Nano,
however the programs which are saved as MP3
do not want to transfer to the list for later transfer
to the Nano.

For those into photography and Nikon especially these
are Nikonian ipod broadcasts.

And while I am at it, there some iTunes which I have
purchased which I would like to copy to a compact disc
for personal use, doesn't happen.

That's when I realized some audio downloads aren't
the traditional MP3 suffix.

Some of these new codes are not recognizable!

Suggestions on the direction on both questions would be appreciated.

chas_m
Sep 30th, 2008, 07:43 PM
I'm having a very hard time understanding your post. Please write in full and complete sentences, and be more specific.

Have downloaded some non iTunes suggested/available programs.

I have absolutely no idea what this means.

I would like to listen to these on the Nano,
however the programs which are saved as MP3
do not want to transfer to the list for later transfer
to the Nano.

Files that you want to play on the Nano must go through iTunes. Add the MP3 files into iTunes and they will then transfer to your iPod (unless they are mislabelled and not MP3s at all, of course).

For those into photography and Nikon especially these
are Nikonian ipod broadcasts.

I don't know what an "iPod broadcast" is, but I presume you mean podcast. Are you trying to say you've gotten some podcasts from sources outside the iTunes store?

If so, that should not make any difference at all. If they are in MP3/AAC or if video MP4 format, they should be "drag and dropped" to import them into your iTunes library, whereupon they will be synced to your Nano.

I would have thought a photography-based podcast would have been a video podcast, and perhaps this is where the problem lies? Perhaps the video is not in a format iTunes accepts?

If you think this is the case, the free iSquint program should convert them to iTunes-acceptable format for you.

And while I am at it, there some iTunes which I have
purchased which I would like to copy to a compact disc
for personal use, doesn't happen.

It should happen. Songs purchased from iTunes can absolutely be burned onto a CD. Have you reviewed the procedure in the help file on how to do this? Basically, you make a PLAYLIST of the songs you want on the CD, then click "burn." A lot of people somehow forget to do this first step.

That's when I realized some audio downloads aren't
the traditional MP3 suffix.

Songs from the iTunes store are AAC (mp4) format, not MP3. Doesn't matter as regards using them on an iPod or burning them to a CD.

Some of these new codes are not recognizable!

Again, no idea what you're talking about here.

Bryce
Sep 30th, 2008, 09:11 PM
Suspect as an old phart (over 60, under 100)
I don't understand descriptions as well as
the younger people do.
I describe things as I see them.
Suspect as with all things
we all describe things differently.
And from what I've seen Charles M. is always
quite helpful. Glad he is on our side!

Shall try this all over once again.

Mind, I am rather stupid, at most times
of late. That's me, not you!

It took me seemingly forever to purchase the iNano,
and then decide what I wanted to place upon it.
Those 4 gigs do not fill quickly! Remember I am of the old and
ancient school of lower is better.

Am trying to find time to learn the iMic so I can tranfer
both 78 rpm and 33.3 records to the Mac and then from the
Mac to the Nano or perhaps a compact disc.

Ditto my huge collection of audio cassettes.

chas_m
Oct 1st, 2008, 06:52 AM
Mind, I am rather stupid, at most times
of late. That's me, not you!

Nobody here is stupid. I'm quite sure there are many areas of life in which I would be the lost, inarticulate one compared to you.

Remember I am of the old and
ancient school of lower is better.

I'm generally of that camp as well.

Am trying to find time to learn the iMic so I can tranfer
both 78 rpm and 33.3 records to the Mac and then from the
Mac to the Nano or perhaps a compact disc.

Awesome idea. Just finding a record player that can play 78s is a bit of a challenge these days!

As for cassettes, I do this *all the time* because I make a podcast out of my old radio show, which was originally recorded on tapes. I use the iMic for this purpose.

Regrettably, I can't find an easy, visual tutorial on the web that does not veer off into esoteric discussions not relevant to your task.

The only thing I found was this video tutorial from Griffin explaining how to connect the turntable to an iMic, which is at least helpful in getting started:
Griffin Technology: Support for iMic (http://www.griffintechnology.com/articles/16)

Basically, getting the sound from the turntable or a cassette using an iMic is pretty easy. Depending on how much you want to fool with it, editing or enhancing the captured sound can take a while.

The resulting file, however, can just be "dragged" into iTunes' main window and stored in the music library. From there, it can be added to others to create a CD, or copied onto an iPod, etc.

So it's a four-step process:

1. Capture the sound using the iMic into a digital audio (AIFF) file.
2. Edit and/or compress the file(s) into MP3 or AAC file(s) (much smaller).
3. Drag the MP3 or AAC file into iTunes, which copies it into the "Music Library."
4. Create playlists that can be burned onto CDs and/or copied onto iPods.

Hope that helps.