: Leopard: Dangerous knowledge


CubaMark
Mar 4th, 2008, 05:19 PM
Change Leopard's Login Shell (http://lifehacker.com/363070/change-leopards-login-shell)

Mac OS X Leopard only: Dig into advanced user settings on your Mac by Ctrl+clicking on an account name in the System Preferences>Accounts area.

Kids, do not try this at home!

;)
M

wonderings
Mar 4th, 2008, 05:22 PM
What exactly is the Login shell? I looked at the link, but the compuspeak is beyond me and I dont understand exactly what this is.

CubaMark
Mar 4th, 2008, 05:37 PM
Which is exactly why people like you (and me!) should go nowhere near this...

:)
M

20DDan
Mar 4th, 2008, 06:05 PM
Seriously... I'm curious... can anyone explain in non-technical terms what a shell is? n what this is about. Please....:confused:

Atroz
Mar 4th, 2008, 06:30 PM
Seriously... I'm curious... can anyone explain in non-technical terms what a shell is? n what this is about. Please....:confused:

These are the real account information that applies to the underlying Unix operating system. UIDs, groups, shells, etc, are all standard fare for Unix/Linux systems.

BTW, don't play with these settings unless it's on a secondary account or you really know what you are doing. You could lock yourself out of your machine.

The Shell, is the command line interface (CLI), "Terminal" in Mac speak. When you are in the CLI, you are actually using a program called a "shell". By default, on OS X it is the "bash" shell (also available on other systems including Linux, Solaris, etc). There are other shells such as the original "sh", the very popular "csh", "zsh", etc. The shell is actually very powerful, it has a scripting language, variables, debugging tools, lots of built in commands, etc.

cap10subtext
Mar 5th, 2008, 12:12 AM
I only noticed for the first time yesterday that NetInfoManager doesn't exist in Leopard. Easy enough to enable root with one line of code, but I thought I was going crazy not being able to find it.

chas_m
Mar 5th, 2008, 05:47 AM
I only noticed for the first time yesterday that NetInfoManager doesn't exist in Leopard. Easy enough to enable root with one line of code, but I thought I was going crazy not being able to find it.

This is now handled within the "Directory Utility."

Still, I strongly advise anyone reading this NOT to enable root unless ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY. Oh the trouble you could cause yourself!

gordguide
Mar 5th, 2008, 01:14 PM
The default shell in OSX was tcsh; that changed to bash in 10.3x. If you upgraded from an earlier OS to 10.3 (and then to 10.4, etc), you will still have tcsh as the default; it has to be changed to bash manually (ie via the Terminal).

New, full installs of 10.3x or later have bash as the default, with tcsh and zsh included, should you wish to switch to either one.

cap10subtext
Mar 5th, 2008, 01:17 PM
This is now handled within the "Directory Utility."

Still, I strongly advise anyone reading this NOT to enable root unless ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY. Oh the trouble you could cause yourself!

Yes, good advice. You can totally ravage your poor computer with one line of code.

Atroz
Mar 5th, 2008, 04:01 PM
Yes, good advice. You can totally ravage your poor computer with one line of code.

Real geeks live on the edge. ;)


I do have root on mine, but don't find I use it very often.

chas_m
Mar 5th, 2008, 07:35 PM
I do have to wonder if that "advanced" panel offers a "safe" way to change the short name -- but there is NO WAY IN HELL I'm going to test that out on my own machine. I know *only too well* what will happen if you change the short name without going through the proper procedure ...

iMouse
Mar 5th, 2008, 07:56 PM
My PeeCee lasted 6 years because I didn't muck with it.

No need to change that behaviour now. ;)

hayesk
Mar 5th, 2008, 11:49 PM
Real geeks live on the edge. ;)

Ha ha, real geeks will spend twenty minutes lecturing you why they nor anyone else should ever log in as root.

GratuitousApplesauce
Mar 6th, 2008, 05:00 PM
Still, I strongly advise anyone reading this NOT to enable root unless ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY. Oh the trouble you could cause yourself!

I'm not a real geek but I have the root account enabled and do occasionally dabble in the Terminal. I rarely log in to the root account but I have found the need to occasionally, usually to get around permissions problems. I guess this qualifies as "absolutely necessary". I also just like knowing that the root account is something that I own and have control of on my computer with my password. Maybe I'm just a control freak.

I know that I can easily mess up things in root or using the CLI and I don't do anything in those modes unless I'm reasonably certain I know it won't cause a problem.

I had to spend quite a bit of time a couple of months ago using Terminal and the root account when I stumbled across an unfortunate lack of functionality in the Get Info window's handling of permissions under Leopard. You can inadvertently make changes to the Access Control Lists in the Get Info window that can't be undone without using Unix, which I discovered the hard way. And I stumbled on to that problem when using the Get Info window on my Standard non-Admin account. Fortunately a few helpful ehMac members and some other anonymous internet postings were able to give me the required Unix info to fix it.

Any user can also really screw up their Mac simply using the default admin account that they first set up on their Mac or allowing other users to access it. I have a friend whose wife decided the desktop was too messy and for some bizarre reason took everything on the desktop and flushed it down the trash. Oooooops.

I think the message should be "Don't do anything on your computer unless you have a pretty good idea that it's not going to irreversibly mess up anything." And, "always have a back-up, in case you do mess it up."

mguertin
Mar 6th, 2008, 05:14 PM
You rarely, if ever need to enable the root account, even to workaround issues. You can get "root" most times without enabling the actual account, by using an admin login and then in terminal doing: sudo bash (or the shell of your choice)

It's a much safer way of getting root as needed...

As for mucking with a shortname or uid ... It's really not worth it. Ever. If you hate the shortname that much make a new account with a shortname you like and migrate your files and settings over ;)