: Creating locked folders in Leopard


Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 12:17 PM
Hey, here's the deal.

I'm having a bunch of old high school friends come over this weekend and they are most likely going to be playing with my new iMac. Here's the problem: i have things on my computer that i don't want any of them to see.

I was wondering if there was anyway to put a password on a folder, or download some kind of program that will allow me to create locked folders for leopard.

Thanks!

- Nick

eMacMan
Feb 19th, 2008, 01:53 PM
Just create a non admin guest account and let them play to their hearts content.

Any photos or music you want to share can be transferred to a thumb drive and accessed that way.

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 02:26 PM
I'de rather not have to do that just to hide something, there must be another way. I Could always just bury the content deep deeep deeeeeeeeeeeeeep into my HD ...

CubaMark
Feb 19th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Nothing is too deep.

Use Disk Utility to make an encrypted disk image.

M

Peaker44
Feb 19th, 2008, 03:06 PM
Man, I've been wondering the same thing for awhile now. I can't believe they don't have something like that. It seems so simple.

monokitty
Feb 19th, 2008, 03:32 PM
Seriously, just create a guest account. When they leave, delete said account. Doesn't seem that intrusive, does it?

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 04:17 PM
Seriously, just create a guest account. When they leave, delete said account. Doesn't seem that intrusive, does it?

That's not what i am asking for. I appreciate the suggestion.

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Nothing is too deep.

Use Disk Utility to make an encrypted disk image.

M

Can you explain to me how this works briefly?

CubaMark
Feb 19th, 2008, 05:35 PM
Very easy!

Open Disk Utility (it's inside /Applications/Utilities )

From the FILE menu, choose NEW-->Blank Disk Image

Give it a name, and choose the size you think you'll need (default is 100 megs, but you can make it whatever you like)

In the same window, choose from the Encryption pop-up menu either 128-bit or 256-bit. For this purpose, 128 is fine (and faster)

Click "Create"

A window will pop-up asking you to enter a password, and again to Verify it.

IMPORTANT: You should uncheck "Remember password in my keychain" on that window, otherwise you will not receive the password challenge when you double-click on the filename.dmg file.

Then - just copy the stuff in there that you want to hide, eject the disk, and delete the original files.

Note that in Step #1, you can also select to "Make a New Disk Image from a Folder", if you already have them in one spot, and you will also have an opportunity to encrypt that image before it is created.

Enjoy!
M

rgray
Feb 19th, 2008, 05:40 PM
Seriously, just create a guest account. When they leave, delete said account. Doesn't seem that intrusive, does it?

Lars is correct. Unix is built to do this stuff. Just create a second admin account and copy the stuff you want them to see to it - everything else is totally protected. The punters will never know the difference. As far as unix is concerned, any other method is just a bunch of stupid busy work.

harrytse
Feb 19th, 2008, 07:05 PM
the encrypted disk image is a more secure solution, but as an alternative
change the user, group, and other permissions on the folder to nobody and no access and lock it. finder will report insufficient privileges and will require authentication with a five minute time window in order to change it.

keep in mind when you change it to nobody the first time that's already an authentication attempt, and a five minute window is in effect.

chas_m
Feb 19th, 2008, 07:31 PM
I third the suggestion to just create a new user account. That's precisely why the ability was created in the first place.

Still, there are also third-party folder-passwording apps available if that's what you really want. Hunt around Versiontracker.com or MacUpdate.com and you'll find them.

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 08:13 PM
I tried the new user thing with a bunch of different settings and they can still see all of my stuff even though i specifically chose for it not too. bahh.

I'll download some passwording apps.

rgray
Feb 19th, 2008, 08:23 PM
I tried the new user thing with a bunch of different settings and they can still see all of my stuff even though i specifically chose for it not too. bahh.

I'll download some passwording apps.

Unix is the secure multiuser OS. It has survived every kind of hostile multi-user system including universities and major corporations where individual security is paramount. If you can't secure accounts one form another it is your error. Are you testing from inside the new account?

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 08:45 PM
Unix is the secure multiuser OS. It has survived every kind of hostile multi-user system including universities and major corporations where individual security is paramount. If you can't secure accounts one form another it is your error. Are you testing from inside the new account?

I do not make errors.

The Doug
Feb 19th, 2008, 09:00 PM
Maybe the best thing is, don't keep stuff on your computer that you never want others to find. :)

rgray
Feb 19th, 2008, 09:01 PM
I do not make errors.

Right. XX)

harrytse
Feb 19th, 2008, 09:58 PM
i'd like to ask what foolproof settings you applied. because even though an administrator can get into a home directory, all the user data directories are 700, so that only the user can even get into those without root privileges.

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 11:12 PM
Right. XX)

I was kidding of course :P

HowEver
Feb 19th, 2008, 11:16 PM
Are you saving files in your user account, or at the root level?

Black
Feb 19th, 2008, 11:17 PM
Are you saving files in your user account, or at the root level?

Root. I then went into Guest account and i could still view them. I'm trying to hide a specific folder.

cap10subtext
Feb 19th, 2008, 11:58 PM
How user friendly do you want your solution to be? There seem to be some good programs at verisontracker:
Secret Folder '08 software download - Mac OS X - VersionTracker (http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/13441)

Do you know your way around linux? This may or may not be helpful and I take no responsibility if you start poking around in system files or doing things in terminal you shouldn't. In fact, if you've never used terminal forget I mentioned it.

Go into terminal and show all hidden folders. Name the file you want with a period at the start of the name, click okay to confirm that you are giving it a system folder designation. Then go into terminal and hide the folders.

To Show: Open the terminal and type:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -bool true

then to refresh the finder with files showing type:

killall Finder

To hide: Reverting to the default of NOT showing hidden files type:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -bool false

then to refresh the finder with files hidden type:

killall Finder



Show Hidden Files in OS X’s Finder | michaelkrol.com (http://michaelkrol.com/2007/10/01/show-hidden-files-in-os-x-finder/)

As for how secure the contents will be, I didn't have any luck finding it in spotlight (though you should check for yourself). I could, however, open the file from an application's recent list even though it was hidden. Anyways, not sure it that helps. Use at your own risk. beejacon

chas_m
Feb 20th, 2008, 02:33 AM
Root. I then went into Guest account and i could still view them. I'm trying to hide a specific folder.

Hello, this is your problem. If you deliberately circumvent the design of the computer, of course you get problems.

Put the folder you wish to "hide" into your User (Home) folder.

NOW create a new user account. OH LOOK!!! THE FOLDER HAS DISAPPEARED!!!

Amazing.

adb_ii
Mar 9th, 2008, 12:34 PM
Secret Folder works exactly how you want. It was perfect for my hiding purposes as well...sneaky sneaky.

Thanks!