: Will and Estate Planning Software


Kirtland
Dec 14th, 2007, 01:32 PM
Does anybody know of any Mac software for creating a will and estate planning documents? I know that Quicken did many years ago (Willmaker), but have discontinued it for Mac (surprise surprise).

johnnyspade
Dec 14th, 2007, 03:04 PM
I don't know of any software but Self Counsel Press is a good hard copy solution. You can purchase and download the forms from their website, I think, or your local bookstore may have them.

Self-Counsel Canada (http://www.self-counsel.com/ca/index.php?cPath=76_84)

cloudniner
Dec 14th, 2007, 09:36 PM
I purchased a PC version and ran it under Parallels without problems. Can't remember the name right now but it was only $14.95.

Kirtland
Dec 15th, 2007, 12:59 PM
I purchased a PC version and ran it under Parallels without problems. Can't remember the name right now but it was only $14.95.
Thanks. I sometimes forget that I have Bootcamp for this reason. My first choice is native Mac, but sometimes you have to slum it :)

chas_m
Dec 15th, 2007, 10:17 PM
I like the fact that in order to deal with death, you need Windows.

Maybe they should call their package iDie. :)

staples57
Dec 17th, 2007, 08:40 PM
My two cents... You get what you pay for.
See a REAL Lawyer and get a proper Will & Estate Planner (power of attorney, guardianship of minors, etc.) A Lawyer can design a Will that meets your needs & wishes.

A software-solution or "kit" will simply walk you through a pre-defined template and produce a basic will.

Any good Lawyer should be able to over-turn a basic/generic Will that required little to no planning.

If your estate/legacy is only worth a few dollars, then spending $15 on a Will "kit" may be all you need. If you have a more substantial estate/legacy, children or specific wishes, then spending a few hundred dollars may be well worth it.

How much do you spend on coffee every week/month?
...more or less than the Will-Kit you're thinking of?

Like I said... just my two cents.

keebler27
Dec 17th, 2007, 09:25 PM
My two cents... You get what you pay for.
See a REAL Lawyer and get a proper Will & Estate Planner (power of attorney, guardianship of minors, etc.) A Lawyer can design a Will that meets your needs & wishes.

A software-solution or "kit" will simply walk you through a pre-defined template and produce a basic will.

Any good Lawyer should be able to over-turn a basic/generic Will that required little to no planning.

If your estate/legacy is only worth a few dollars, then spending $15 on a Will "kit" may be all you need. If you have a more substantial estate/legacy, children or specific wishes, then spending a few hundred dollars may be well worth it.

How much do you spend on coffee every week/month?
...more or less than the Will-Kit you're thinking of?

Like I said... just my two cents.

i agree with this 100%. much better than software. you're talking about your personal belongings and effects. better to have it legally bound properly by someone live.

eggman
Dec 17th, 2007, 11:16 PM
A real will done with the help of a real lawyer will have a flexibility and precision that is likely to be lacking in anything done through a kit.

A kit might be fine if:

1) You only using it to get your thoughts and ideas together before you go and see a real lawyer (they can be a good tool for that) and get something finalized and durable done.

or

2) You, and your relatives are completely and astoundingly ordinary - no kids (or kids over their age of majority for the province you live in) no ex's, no kids with the ex. No nieces or nephews who you'd like to leave something to - but you don't want their no good father (who skipped town a decade ago) to get one penny of... etc. etc.

A simple example of legal trivia (if I remember it from the lawyer's talk I heard during a retirement course)

In Quebec - people die in order of seniority
In Ontario - people die when they die (time on death certificate)

This little bit of trivia could easily direct or misdirect an entire estate:

Take a horrific car accident - the kind of accident that provides the kind of injuries that allow an ambulance attendant to declare someone dead.

I both members of a domestic partnership are in that accident, and the accident happens in Quebec - then the oldest is presumed to have died first - their estate goes to the next oldest... etc. Without a will, or without a properly crafted will - the estate does not necessarily go where the deceased would have wished (as in - you may think your current wife and kids would inherit... but you'd be wrong).

If the same horrific situation were to arise in Ontario - then depending on which side of the car the ambulance attendant approaches first - that person may be declared dead minutes before the other, and the estate passes from one to the other an then on to any survivors - down that side of the line.

A bit of legalistic trivia like this, and a couple with wills that are not well written (or one with and one without a will) could easily mis-direct an estate.

A questionable will, or no will - could put the estate into trust until any inheriting children come of age - that is something that you can, in a properly constructed will - minimize the cost of. If the province has to hold the trust (which they will if you don't have a will) - it will cost your inheritors more, and then they might get it when they are 18 (or the age of majority where they live) and ready to party... which might not be a good thing for them in the long run.

Most lawyers will do a will for a flat fee - if your needs, desires, and family situation are not too complicated. Use the kit or software to get your thoughts together, maybe even draft it - but then get the final one done by a real lawyer in your province.

There is a website for writers/artists people who should have wills and often don't - it provides an example of the kind of thing that a creative person might want to have written up - and it strongly suggests that after you've read the pdf, scribbled some notes and thought about it - you go see a lawyer. It is free, and might provide some info to get you started before you seek out a lawyer. The public library can also help you with material like this.

I found it here:
Neil Gaiman - Neil Gaiman's Journal: Important. And pass it on... (http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2006/10/important-and-pass-it-on.html)

There is a kind of precision in the legal language of a will, and there needs to be. It is a precision that people not used to working with that language may not be able to attain, and without that precision, their last wishes may not be realized.

Sorry if the above stuff is a bit distracted, scattershot and imprecise. It should be noted that I did not write my own will. Hopefully it will provide some stuff to think about, and to talk to your lawyer about.

onarock
May 5th, 2013, 12:53 PM
I like the fact that in order to deal with death, you need Windows.

Maybe they should call their package iDie. :)

i needed the chuckle...... :lmao:

i love my mac......

k