: Favourite Bread Recipe


guytoronto
Jul 30th, 2007, 11:20 PM
I thought I'd share my favourite bread recipe for all you ehMacers. I have a cheap Black & Decker bread machine, and I love the bread it puts out:

1 3/8 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
3 tbsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup oats, ground (sent through my coffee grinder)
1/4 cup flax, ground (again, sent through my coffee grinder)
1/4 cup wheat gluten (available at bulk food stores, like the Bulk Barn)
1 1/2 tbsp dry milk powder
2 tsp yeast

Add all the ingredients to your bread machine in that order, hit 1.5 lb loaf on the Whole Wheat cycle, and away you go. I usually load my machine up the night before, set the timer, and next morning I wake up to great bread.

P.S. Stephen Harper caused my last loaf of bread not to rise.

teeterboy3
Jul 31st, 2007, 12:47 AM
Cause he eats babies?

(p.s. thanks for the ressipy. consider it printed for future use)

Lichen Software
Jul 31st, 2007, 08:03 AM
Last year I went to the Good Food Festival with my wife. At the Ontario Home Economics Booth they had a book "Canada's Best Bread Machine Baking Recipes" by Donna Waswhburn and Heather Butt. The publisher is Robert Rose.

These two ladies have litterally written the books on bread machines. They started out testing machines for Black and Decker in Prescott. I think they act as consultants for a lot of the companies now.

What makes this book really impressive to me is I always substitute olive oil for any of the grease in the recipe. I spite of this, I still have not made any 1 1/2 pound stones.

There is a large variety inslcuding some hearth breads where the machine is used as a mixer and the actual baking is done in an oven.

rgray
Jul 31st, 2007, 08:22 AM
http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:JwPfLMG6RAx-mM:media.linspire.com/ltoast/wonderbread.gif
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/06/Wonder_Bread_Open.JPG/180px-Wonder_Bread_Open.JPG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonder_Bread) :D
"Make my bed out of wonder bread.." James Taylor's Chili Dog (http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/j/james_taylor/chili_dog.html) :clap:

MLeh
Jul 31st, 2007, 12:50 PM
I've given up on making a decent loaf of bread completely in the breadmaker. Works well to just use the dough setting and then form the dough into a loaf or buns (or occasionally cinnamon rolls) and then baking it in the regular oven.

fozy
Jul 31st, 2007, 01:48 PM
What's wrong with the way the bread machine cooks it?

gwillikers
Jul 31st, 2007, 04:20 PM
Thanks guytoronto, I haven't used our bread machine in months, and now I have a reason to dig it out of the cupboard.

GratuitousApplesauce
Jul 31st, 2007, 04:27 PM
I was a baker one summer 20 years ago and I made 40 - 100 loaves every day by hand. No big Hobart mixer, no helpers, just me and 3 commercial ovens.

Sorry folks, but bread machines make inferior bread. They can be handy for having some quick fresh bread ready without any effort first thing in the morning with the timer or for making something like pizza dough, but for any bread you want that actually has the qualities of good bread, forget it.

Even the worst bread when fresh out of the oven with some butter melting on it is going to be somewhat mouth-watering, but my test for good bread is the taste and texture once it's cooled down and without anything on it. Truly good bread will have a delicious flavour without a spread of butter and for quite some time after being baked. The crust will be baked crusty and the crumb will be chewy and substantial. A bread machine simply can't do this.

Longer risings are the key to developing flavour and texture in the dough. Multi-day risings, especially the levain style that has become common from the "artisan" style bakeries that have proliferated in last decade or so really enhance the flavour of the grain. Even single day bread, using a sponge method will help this. Again, a bread machine can't accomplish this.

My favourite bakeries in the Vancouver area are Terra Breads and Ecco il Pane. Both have grown into quite large businesses, so I'm expecting the quality to dive sometime soon, but so far they've maintained it. They still hand-form all loaves and an actual baker loads and watches the ovens. All Terra Breads are levain sourdough, except for their French white.

I've heard good things about Artisan Bakery in North Van. I know a young woman who works there and she is passionate about her job. I've also heard that Patisserie Lebeau makes some good bread, but I haven't been for a visit yet.

One of my favourite breads that I make is a Kalamata Olive loaf. I also like Walnut breads. The dough takes on a purple hue from the walnuts.

I start the dough on a Tuesday for Saturday baking. This gives the dough several days to slowly rise, with barely any yeast and develop flavour.

My oven just can't maintain the temps required to do a really good loaf, I usually like to bake around 450 F to get a good crust. I put a pan of water in the bottom during the initial oven spring and spray the oven with water during the first few minutes to create steam that makes the traditional crusty crust. Commercial bakeries have bread ovens with integrated steam jets.

Since I like a crusty loaf, I don't use bread pans, all my loaves are usually round or batard (torpedo) shape. I have some baguette pans now which is fun. I get a lot of pot luck dinner invites. :)

gwillikers
Jul 31st, 2007, 05:11 PM
That's very informative GA, a kind of bread 101.
It reminds me of how much I miss the fresh bread and buns my grandmother, and mother, used to make when I was young. It also is likely the reason why our bread machine is packed away. It's good in a pinch, but nothing like a good hand-made, oven baked, recipe.

guytoronto
Jul 31st, 2007, 05:27 PM
Sorry folks, but bread machines make inferior bread. They can be handy for having some quick fresh bread ready without any effort first thing in the morning with the timer or for making something like pizza dough, but for any bread you want that actually has the qualities of good bread, forget it.
What a piece of arrogant crap.

Even the worst bread when fresh out of the oven with some butter melting on it is going to be somewhat mouth-watering, but my test for good bread is the taste and texture once it's cooled down and without anything on it. Truly good bread will have a delicious flavour without a spread of butter and for quite some time after being baked. The crust will be baked crusty and the crumb will be chewy and substantial. A bread machine simply can't do this.
Your opinion and a dollar are worth about a dollar. Your test for good bread is egotistical and arrogant. You rank right up there with people who judge wines and cheese, and mock those who like a $5 bottle of red with marble cheese.

Longer risings are the key to developing flavour and texture in the dough. Multi-day risings, especially the levain style that has become common from the "artisan" style bakeries that have proliferated in last decade or so really enhance the flavour of the grain. Even single day bread, using a sponge method will help this. Again, a bread machine can't accomplish this.
Good for your longer rising, multi-day, artisan blah blah blah. How many people actually care about any of that? Do you ever stand in a grocery store and lambast people for picking up a loaf of Wonder? "Hey you! With the Wonder Bread. You suck, 'cuz that bread doesn't have the enhanced flavour of the grain!"

Ya, I started this thread to talk about a favourite recipe, and you gotta come charging in with your 'Holier Than Thou" attitude when it comes to bread. Thanks dude for contributing positively.

jamesB
Jul 31st, 2007, 06:03 PM
Since I like a crusty loaf, I don't use bread pans, all my loaves are usually round or batard (torpedo) shape. I have some baguette pans now which is fun. I get a lot of pot luck dinner invites. :)

Before you know it, he'll be riding a bicycle and wearing "socks and sandals".;)

jb.

Sonal
Jul 31st, 2007, 06:05 PM
Ah, I love homemade from scratch bread... but for me, half the pleasure is in the tactile sensation of kneading it and working the dough. (Not a bread machine person here--I prefer to get my hands in there.)

GratuitousApplesauce
Jul 31st, 2007, 06:20 PM
What a piece of arrogant crap.


Your opinion and a dollar are worth about a dollar. Your test for good bread is egotistical and arrogant. You rank right up there with people who judge wines and cheese, and mock those who like a $5 bottle of red with marble cheese.


Good for your longer rising, multi-day, artisan blah blah blah. How many people actually care about any of that? Do you ever stand in a grocery store and lambast people for picking up a loaf of Wonder? "Hey you! With the Wonder Bread. You suck, 'cuz that bread doesn't have the enhanced flavour of the grain!"

Ya, I started this thread to talk about a favourite recipe, and you gotta come charging in with your 'Holier Than Thou" attitude when it comes to bread. Thanks dude for contributing positively.
You're funny GT, - the biggest knee-jerk poster on ehMac freaks out at someone for politely expressing his opinion. Can you ever make a post without name-calling and flying off the handle, "dude"?

Pot meet kettle.

Someone already expressed their opinion of bread machines and another person asked what is wrong with them. I just answered that. I'm sorry but if you think you can make good bread with a bread machine you would be wrong. You can make a bread-like substance that will melt butter or make some simple dough for something where the bread component is secondary, like pizza dough, but that's all. But if you like bread machine bread don't let my arrogant opinions stand in your way - fill up! Have some cheap-o wine and cheez whiz with it too. ;)

How many people actually care about any of that?
Hmmm ... maybe those who care about what they eat ... those who maybe don't eat Wonder bread.

GratuitousApplesauce
Jul 31st, 2007, 06:21 PM
Before you know it, he'll be riding a bicycle and wearing "socks and sandals".;)

jb.

:confused:

gwillikers
Aug 1st, 2007, 04:24 AM
Well, I guess this thread is toast.

:lmao: :lmao:

I laugh at my own jokes sometimes. :lmao:

SINC
Aug 1st, 2007, 06:42 AM
Personally, I found GA's post quite educational. One has to read and absorb to gain further knowledge on the art of making bread. And it IS an art, never duplicated by a machine. The part that rang true for me was memories of my Mother misting water into the hot oven to "set" the crust as she put it to me those many years ago.

There are those of us who appreciated your efforts GA. Thanks.

rgray
Aug 1st, 2007, 08:37 AM
................... wearing "socks and sandals".;)

Would someone please explain what the hell is wrong with wearing socks with sandals anyway?

Lichen Software
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:19 AM
Nothing.

Apparently there are still people who fail to understand the joy of winter sandals :-)

rgray
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:29 AM
Nothing.

Apparently there are still people who fail to understand the joy of winter sandals :-)

Exactly!! :D Thank you! :clap:

Lichen Software
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:31 AM
Personally, I found GA's post quite educational. One has to read and absorb to gain further knowledge on the art of making bread. And it IS an art, never duplicated by a machine. The part that rang true for me was memories of my Mother misting water into the hot oven to "set" the crust as she put it to me those many years ago.

There are those of us who appreciated your efforts GA. Thanks.

If you start reading a history of food, it is not only an art but in the past was a protected trade.

Roman bakers were entered into the trade for life with vows of secrecy and the whole bit ... Under pain of death

In Medieval Europe, the normal person absolutely could not afford either to purchase or to run an oven. People made up their loaves and then brought them to the baker to bake.

It is right in our day to day sayings. Loaves were burned on the bottom and golden on the top many times. The bread was not sliced, it was split separating out the top and the bottom into upper and lower crust. The upper crust was reserved for important guests.

I believe that Wonder Bread was the first mechanically sliced bread. All of a sudden, there was little or no waste in the loaf and fair portions were easy to serve. This is why we have the expression "The greatest thing since sliced bread". It really was a big deal.

We have all heard of Trench Mouth. There were no such things as plates. There were trenchers. These were either wooden boards or a bottom crust of stale bread. The meal was served on this. Trench Mouth came from eating off dirty wooden trenchers.

There is lots more to bread than just a bag of slices. It is right through our culture.

That all being said, I still like my bread machine bread. It uses technology I can access. Using olive oil instead of other fats gives a crispy crust. It makes a great change from the same old same old.

guytoronto
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:33 AM
Would someone please explain what the hell is wrong with wearing socks with sandals anyway?

It's grounds for execution in many countries.

Lichen Software
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:43 AM
It's grounds for execution in many countries.

Perfectly allowable in any climate zone less than zone 5. Preferred method of sandal deployment below climate zone 3

Sonal
Aug 1st, 2007, 12:56 PM
Would someone please explain what the hell is wrong with wearing socks with sandals anyway?

Primarily aesthetics.

In North American culture, it also (generally) signifies a certain granola-crunchy inability to fit into social norms--note that I say "inability" not choice, since surely if you truly knew better, you would not be wearing socks and sandals. ;)

This may further imply a lack of professionalism (outside of organic and hemp-related fields), and then further implies that while this might be a very nice person who can tell you all about trees and the ozone layer, they are a little clueless and you couldn't take them anywhere where you might need to impress people.

Winter sandals--merely an attempt at defending the undefendable.

I'm about 60% serious. :D

Incidentally, I make my own granola... but you'd never know it from my footwear.

jamesB
Aug 1st, 2007, 01:20 PM
It's grounds for execution in many countries.

Good thing for many that Canada did away with the "Death Penalty".

jb.

MLeh
Aug 1st, 2007, 01:23 PM
I hope I can speak with some authority on this issue, as I live in a hemp wearing, granola eating, last (and unfortunately, no longer lost) hippie backwater rapidly becoming inundated with lifestyle challenged commuters and recent retirees who want to 'get away from it all', but have actually 'brought it all with them'.

Fact: Socks become wet when worn with sandals and it rains.

The issue is not the fact that people wear socks and sandals, it's if they express surprise when their feet get cold and damp during the rainy season. Gum boots were invented for a reason.

Now, secondly, it is not the 'socks with sandals' thing that really sets one apart as being clothing challenged. It's SHORTS with socks and sandals. BAD FORM.

Sonal
Aug 1st, 2007, 01:54 PM
Now, secondly, it is not the 'socks with sandals' thing that really sets one apart as being clothing challenged. It's SHORTS with socks and sandals. BAD FORM.

Especially black socks....

Lichen Software
Aug 1st, 2007, 04:27 PM
I hope I can speak with some authority on this issue, as I live in a hemp wearing, granola eating, last (and unfortunately, no longer lost) hippie backwater rapidly becoming inundated with lifestyle challenged commuters and recent retirees who want to 'get away from it all', but have actually 'brought it all with them'.

Fact: Socks become wet when worn with sandals and it rains.

The issue is not the fact that people wear socks and sandals, it's if they express surprise when their feet get cold and damp during the rainy season. Gum boots were invented for a reason.

Now, secondly, it is not the 'socks with sandals' thing that really sets one apart as being clothing challenged. It's SHORTS with socks and sandals. BAD FORM.

I see that you are in BC. Willing to bet you are in at least climate zone 5, certainly higher than zone 2. In zone 2 - they are worn for warmth, but it is OK because it is a "dry cold".

I confess that I have to agree with you on socks, sandals and shorts.

MLeh
Aug 1st, 2007, 09:44 PM
I see that you are in BC. Willing to bet you are in at least climate zone 5, certainly higher than zone 2. In zone 2 - they are worn for warmth, but it is OK because it is a "dry cold".

I confess that I have to agree with you on socks, sandals and shorts.

I don't know anything about 'climate zones', but where I live now is classified as 'temperate rain forest' if that correlates to a particular zone. ;)

(But I grew up in the land of the 'dry cold' and nobody with a lick of sense wore sandals with socks there. Cowboy boots all the way.)

gwillikers
Aug 1st, 2007, 10:42 PM
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