: Old macs....where do they go?


robb1
Feb 18th, 2007, 07:48 PM
I've got a few old macs that I'd like to get rid of (PM6100/66, 7500, etc) with old monitors and keyboards & mice. Any good choices for recycling or donating?

MacDoc
Feb 18th, 2007, 07:57 PM
Reboot

Tiranis
Feb 18th, 2007, 10:33 PM
LOL, as soon as I read the thread title I just wanted to say: "Heaven" :)

Sorry, I don't have any useful input. :(

djstp
Feb 18th, 2007, 11:24 PM
you can give them to me......:D

i can even do a donation to a charitable cause for you in yer name in return.... :)

RunTheWorldOnMac
Feb 19th, 2007, 08:36 AM
I was gonna say they are reserved a place in Heaven as well... I am sure they don't let pc's into Heaven...unless they are wiped clean and have a version of Mac for PC installed at the pearly gates....

Jason H
Feb 19th, 2007, 10:48 AM
I've got a few old macs that I'd like to get rid of (PM6100/66, 7500, etc) with old monitors and keyboards & mice. Any good choices for recycling or donating?
I'd be amazed if anyone took them off your hands for free.

BigDL
Feb 19th, 2007, 03:57 PM
You could join and post on Free Cycle Here. (http://www.freecycle.org/display.php?region=Canada) :clap:

gordguide
Feb 19th, 2007, 04:44 PM
If you try to dispose of them by the same means you would use to sell your snowblower or microwave, yeah, they might be hard to move. But, there is a place to trade everything, even 10 year old computers. You just have to properly target your efforts, just like everything else.

Go to Google Groups (http://groups.google.ca/?hl=en), join the Low End Mac LEM Swap List (http://groups.google.ca/group/lemswap?lnk=srg&hl=en) and the LEM list for your particular vintage Macs (sounds like Pre-G3 PPC Macs (http://groups.google.ca/group/pci-powermacs?lnk=gschg&hl=en)). Offer to sell or give them away (note: check the lists online to see a range of selling prices, but I can tell you that these machines go for no more than $20 or so each; Free is common, but you can also ask for people to make trade offers; you never know what you can get that you might be able to use).

Mention where you are; many sellers on these lists are zenophobic Americans who won't ship outside the lower 48 states, so you should find people who are looking for your stuff who live in Canada pretty easily. There was a student in BC pleading for a donated 7100 a few weeks ago, and there is someone looking for ADB mice and KBs right now on MacCanada.

Be sure to read the list etiquette so you don't break any rules, because as a new member your posts will be moderated before they are listed (Anti-Spam safeguards). Some things to watch for: reply to individuals, not the whole list, so think before you hit "send". Also, you must list a price, although "OBO" is allowed. "Free" is a price, by the way. Some lists are discussion-only, check to make sure.

Also know that, because of the moderation, it may take a few hours for your post to show up, and if you get the list via eMail know that your own posts may not be sent to you; check the digest at Google Groups to see if they were posted to everyone else. Don't double post; wait at least one day for any new message to show up; the mods have a life too, you know.

You could also join the LEM Mac Canada (http://groups.google.ca/group/mac-canada?lnk=gschg&hl=en) list, to reach those willing to pick them up in your town.

They will be gone in a week, guaranteed. If you are really interested in getting rid of everything you could insist on someone taking all or nothing; at least give it a try and see, at first.

You don't need to have posts sent via eMail to you but it's convenient if you do; you have a choice of a digest (a day's worth in one eMail) or each eMail as it's posted. Once your old Macs are gone, be sure to follow the link on every eMail at the bottom to unsubscribe, and be sure to send the unsubscribe request from the same eMail address you signed up with, or they won't know who you are and the unsubscribe won't work. Unless of course you want to remain a member for a while.

If you have or need any other Mac stuff, you can find it there at very good prices, by the way, or make sure it goes to someone who will use it. Macs back to the original 128's all the way to recent G4s and G5s are sought after all the time; the only things you will have a hard time getting rid of are CRT monitors and All-In-Ones that are expensive to ship due to weight and volume.

MACinist
Feb 19th, 2007, 10:33 PM
Have it recycled and don't pass the burdon on to the next person or better yet to someone that feels no guilt in polluting this planet even more by putting it into general waste.

http://www.norandarecycling.com/

http://www.era.ca/

teknikz
Feb 19th, 2007, 11:10 PM
I have a question about these macs , do they work on 220V. I would considering buying a few beige boxes and iMacs and taking them with me on my trip to Africa and donating them to a school near my grandfathers city. I used macs as a kid in school and it really sparked my intrest in computers. Hoping I can do the same

liamcward
Feb 20th, 2007, 01:27 PM
http://www.flowerseast.com/Originals_Grouping_Large.asp?Grouping=05EBCHNREC&OL=5

gmark2000
Feb 21st, 2007, 11:37 AM
I would like to 'borrow' someone's old mac that has internet/networking AND SCSI. I simply want to get some old data off of some SCSI hard drives.

I'm in Oakville.

robert
Feb 21st, 2007, 11:41 AM
I have my PM 7300 with photoshop 5.5 set up for my 3yr ld . She draws with the mouse and plays her music. I figure she will be well versed by the time she needs to use a computer for school.

There is always a use for any computer, even if it is a glorified typewriter.

archimed
Feb 21st, 2007, 11:57 AM
Considering the weight of the average beige mac, I'd just go for a few blueberry iMacs instead. They're quite a bit lighter IIRC, and they package better for shipping. Plus, they're a lot easier to get a hold of these days.

Good on ya though - I also know someone that did a mac 'mission' to africa. :)

HowEver
Feb 21st, 2007, 01:08 PM
I'm wondering if a SCSI-to-USB adapter would work for you. Then again, that might be harder to find than an old SCSI mac, but maybe not; once I found one I saw there were scores of sources.



I would like to 'borrow' someone's old mac that has internet/networking AND SCSI. I simply want to get some old data off of some SCSI hard drives.

I'm in Oakville.

gordguide
Feb 21st, 2007, 02:06 PM
" ... I have a question about these macs , do they work on 220V. ..."

Although you should double check for your particular model, as far as I know all Macs and Powerbooks have universal power supplies (50/60 Hz 90~240 Volts). Because computers use what is called a switching power supply, there is no extra costs associated with building a universal power supply and it would be rare to find computer that did not handle any known AC power without modification.

You need the correct power cable for whatever country you are in, which you should be able to buy locally (the squarish 3-prong connector on the back of the Mac is an IEC connector, the end that plugs into the wall will vary depending on what country you are in. If you buy locally, you will avoid the risk of getting the wrong one).

" ... I'm wondering if a SCSI-to-USB adapter would work for you. ..."

Maybe, if the Gods Smile Upon You. Generally, they don't work for anyone.

Use Ethernet.

For legacy Macs without Ethernet ports, use an SCSI to Ethernet adapter. They work. Beginning with the Mac Plus every Mac has built-in SCSI or Ethernet, or both.

However, there is an issue with newer (very recent) Macs. Starting with OSX 10.4x you cannot connect to legacy Macs as the necessary networking support was dropped (Apple announced they were going to drop support for it 5 years ago, so it's not like it came out of nowhere). You need a Mac that can run 10.3x or earlier.

teknikz
Feb 21st, 2007, 04:12 PM
Considering the weight of the average beige mac, I'd just go for a few blueberry iMacs instead. They're quite a bit lighter IIRC, and they package better for shipping. Plus, they're a lot easier to get a hold of these days.

Good on ya though - I also know someone that did a mac 'mission' to africa. :)

Shipping is not a huge deal as were taking a whole container but yeah those things are quite heavy , but yeah I have gotten 15 iMacs so far , my plan is to give the beige boxes to the local schools so they can use their own monitors and establish a little "cafe" with the iMacs so people can really enjoy the isdn their getting. My cousin is moving there full time and im hoping this can give him a little sustenance. I figured since all i'll be doing for a few weeks is setting up computers , I might as well do a little favour for the local school seeing as how their ibms are virus plagued and the children(well teens) often have to travel a ways away to a internet cafe.

I think the one "it" guy , if you can call him that. Nice fellow but doesn't have a clue about computers but hes doing the best he can under his limited budget and knowledge. Will be amazed by the simplicity of maintaining the macs. I figure with the biege boxes if the monitors get messed up he can simply replace them.

Im a little worried about power fluctuations though , seeing as how the school only has local power(which is VERY unreliable at best) and a small generator for essential purposes.

Is there anything i should know about os9? Perhaps some simple known issues and troubleshooting tips (in laymans terms , its a little difficult to translate tech words) ?

gordguide
Feb 21st, 2007, 04:23 PM
" ... Im a little worried about power fluctuations though , seeing as how the school only has local power(which is VERY unreliable at best) and a small generator for essential purposes ..."

Generator power is VERY hard on computer power supplies. Unstable grid power is almost as bad. You definitely want to beg/borrow/aquire some UPS's or the Macs won't last long. Power supplies age and move steadily toward failure with time; but even a new computer would last half as long under those conditions without a UPS.

Or, you can just run them until they break, and replace them with whatever comes down the pipe in the future.

Be sure everyone involved is clear on the dangers of any computer than contains a CRT monitor. There is extremely high voltage present, and it will be stored in the capacitors for a long time, even if there is no power present. Opening the case when powered up, or afterwards without safely discharging the stored energy can release lethal voltages.

teknikz
Feb 21st, 2007, 04:47 PM
" ... Im a little worried about power fluctuations though , seeing as how the school only has local power(which is VERY unreliable at best) and a small generator for essential purposes ..."

Generator power is VERY hard on computer power supplies. Unstable grid power is almost as bad. You definitely want to beg/borrow/aquire some UPS's or the Macs won't last long. Power supplies age and move steadily toward failure with time; but even a new computer would last half as long under those conditions without a UPS.

Or, you can just run them until they break, and replace them with whatever comes down the pipe in the future.

Be sure everyone involved is clear on the dangers of any computer than contains a CRT monitor. There is extremely high voltage present, and it will be stored in the capacitors for a long time, even if there is no power present. Opening the case when powered up, or afterwards without safely discharging the stored energy can release lethal voltages.

Wow , I didn't even know that. Thats very kind of you to spend your time sharing your expertise , I really appreciate everyones help in the bunch of questions i have posted in my short time here on ehmac.

Its silly to say a computer changes people , but I guess the people who use macs and forums like these were already great guys and girls before they even bought a mac.

I really feel welcome into this "digital lifestyle"