: Is it worth purchasing a P2P application?


Apple101
Feb 11th, 2007, 03:09 PM
Hi everyone!

I just have a quick question. I download allot of music (mainly on iTunes) however quite a few of my friends have been telling me that I would save allot of money if I just purchased a P2P application such as LimeWire or Acquisition. What do you think? Is it worth it or should I just stick with iTunes? I was told I can get my downloads with comparable sound quality to that of iTunes.

Any suggestions or thoughts would be helpful!

Bjornbro
Feb 11th, 2007, 04:29 PM
...quite a few of my friends have been telling me that I would save allot of money if I just purchased a P2P application such as LimeWire or Acquisition.
(Excluding your moral compass) at this time, you're legally within your right to download via P2P, but sometimes it's just not worth the hassle. If ever downloading music is ruled illegal (like in the U.S.) you'll have to forfeit your library. With iTunes you get instant gratification, fast downloads, the right cover art, the right song information, properly encoded (although I would prefer 192kbps vs. 128kbps) and it's yours to keep forever.

Demosthenes X
Feb 11th, 2007, 04:38 PM
I think paying for a P2P application has a sickening degree of irony. I prefer to use free Aquisition when the need arises (even though it is, bar none, the most annoying "buy me!!!" software ever... ugh).

If I weren't a starving student, I would buy albums or use iTunes.

mguertin
Feb 11th, 2007, 04:39 PM
It's not worth it. Most of the P2P networks are so full of virii (for windows hehe), spam and generic crap that finding real content can end up being a challenge these days. As for comparable quality sound wise ... very very it and miss. You might find some good audio if you're really lucky, but there's no way to tell unless you download it all and see for yourself .. and hope that the content really is what it said it was or it was a honeypot someone was using to collect your IP and such ;)

Also, you really don't have to purchase a P2P app to test these waters if you're so inclined, you can try them for free and make your own decision from there.

HowEver
Feb 11th, 2007, 05:41 PM
I would never counsel people to download music and movies and apps and such, but P2P is NOT the way to go anymore. And there are a lot of legal things to download using torrents.

And there are places like archive.org where movies and music have entered the public domain.

martman
Feb 11th, 2007, 06:02 PM
I'm listening to a hot Dead show I was at in Ann Arbour MI on archive.org as we speak!
I love archive.org! Some of my recordings are up on the archive.

AppleEnthusiast
Feb 11th, 2007, 06:14 PM
Solarseek is free, torrents too.

Not saying you should go downloading copyrighted stuff, but don't waste your money buying a P2P app.

vimy
Feb 11th, 2007, 07:03 PM
What I did:
Downloaded the free version of limewire. Not really a difference between the two though. I use frostwire currently and its great. Dont pay for p2p service.


Music wise: If I wasnt a student and didnt have a incredibly fast local network for my school to download from I would purchase from iTunes. Like somebody said earlier, its fast, all the information is correct and its legal. :clap:

EDIT: Please no notes on how to pirate applications.

Carl
Feb 11th, 2007, 11:46 PM
As much as it may upset some. Downloading music is not illegal in this country and existing privacy laws would make it extremely difficult to make any other kind of downloading illegal.
P2P clients are free. Acquisition has a nag if you don't pay. The Windows P2P offerings come with spyware, but ironically the P2P population does not tolerate virii or spyware and I have yet to see any.
Bittorrents are far more reliable as a source of information and Azureus is probably the best. It allows the installation of a plugin called SafePeer which blocks all known IP's that could create problems. It is updated regularly.
P2P actually offers better encoded music, higher sample rates and all the cover art you would ever require. Anyone that tells you different has had marginal experience with the medium.

John Clay
Feb 12th, 2007, 12:10 AM
Bittorrents are far more reliable as a source of information and Azureus is probably the best. It allows the installation of a plugin called SafePeer which blocks all known IP's that could create problems. It is updated regularly.
P2P actually offers better encoded music, higher sample rates and all the cover art you would ever require. Anyone that tells you different has had marginal experience with the medium.

Ignorance is bliss, I suppose.

SafePeer does nothing to protect you - your IP is still reported to the tracker, and distributed to other peers (including those on the block list). It only stops them from connecting to you, which they don't really need to do.

Also, the majority of P2P sound files are low quality, misnamed, etc. That is not to say that there aren't some good files, just that most aren't worth listening to.

AppleEnthusiast
Feb 12th, 2007, 03:07 AM
Also, the majority of P2P sound files are low quality, misnamed, etc. That is not to say that there aren't some good files, just that most aren't worth listening to.


Solarseek is full of music nerds, you can always find top quality and rare stuff too. It's the mac version of SoulSeek. You can pretty much pick the quality you want, VBR stuff, whatever.

Chealion
Feb 12th, 2007, 04:29 AM
If I weren't a starving student, I would buy albums or use iTunes.

As a poor working student (I work part time to put myself through school), I buy albums from iTunes because I'm too impatient to order from Amazon or put my shoes to the pavement and find them around town.

John Clay
Feb 12th, 2007, 09:51 AM
Solarseek is full of music nerds, you can always find top quality and rare stuff too. It's the mac version of SoulSeek. You can pretty much pick the quality you want, VBR stuff, whatever.


True - I was mostly referring to LimeWire/Acquisition and other Gnutella clients.

Pelao
Feb 12th, 2007, 10:06 AM
With iTunes you get instant gratification, fast downloads, the right cover art, the right song information, properly encoded (although I would prefer 192kbps vs. 128kbps) and it's yours to keep forever.

The higher bit rate would be deeply appreciated. I wish, I wish....

Apple101
Feb 12th, 2007, 04:42 PM
Well thanks a million for all of your replies. I really appreciate it. Well By the looks of things I am definitely going to stick with iTunes. However for music that is hard to find what would be my best bet? Bittorrent or as what AppleEnthusiast mentioned Solarseek?

Once again I really appreciate the replies guys!

the_hammer
Feb 12th, 2007, 05:00 PM
I have a few suggestions.

1. Aquisition is a pretty sweet P2P client, I dropped the cash on it and have to say it's one of the best clients I've ever used.

2. iTunes is nice, but 128 bit rate is terrible, granted if you want real depth and clarity you should just go buy the disc (which I do) but for the odd pop song or album it's fine.

3. Some of the other options for downloading are eMusic (which isn't bad for obscure stuff though their selection is pretty limited)

4. allofmp3 is also still up and running and while it's sketchy and not quite legal, it's by far the best service for finding just about anything at a great price, minus drm, and any bit rate you desire.

My attitude is, If I want the disc I buy the disc. If I want just one song I download it. I think I'm justified because I drop a good chunk of change to see these guys live whenever they tour here.

Of course that's one man's justification.

dona83
Feb 12th, 2007, 05:03 PM
eMusic reeks! Go to www.audiolunchbox.com

kloan
Feb 12th, 2007, 05:32 PM
well... you could always download the free version and use it to download the $ version. ;)

ZRXer
Feb 12th, 2007, 06:27 PM
I use iTunes for about 95% of my music needs, but when something comes up where I'm forced to buy the whole album, etc when I don't want to, I use Poisoned. I find it's an excellent P2P app.

One of the most annoying things with P2P as far as I've found is that, as per others who have already posted, finding the good version amongst the 50 crappy ones isn't always easy. Often, record labels use spamming to throw 100's of different versions onto the P2P networks, resulting in enormous numbers of hits when you do a search. I find it's easy to round it down to the right ones when you sort by length of the track - I look up the right track length on iTunes and find the ones that fit into that category on the P2P and go from there. Either way, I've found iTunes almost always has what I need and for $0.99, you really can't beat it. Unless you just want U2's "The Saints Are Coming..." and not the whole freakin' album...

jhollington
Feb 12th, 2007, 07:23 PM
Personally, I gave up on P2P applications a long time ago, and not just because of the ethical considerations.

Downloading from P2P in this country is still a grey area if you want to get technical, although as of yet there has been no opportunity for anybody to make a precedent out of it, so you're probably pretty safe from the sort of prosecution of lawsuits that have been rearing their heads in the U.S., for now at least.

However, for me the real issue is one of convenience. iTunes has a pretty decent library, the stuff is all perfectly tagged, includes album artwork, and is very easy to find. Even leaving all ethical and legal considerations aside, that level of convenience is easily worth a buck a song for me, since my time is worth money, and I would spend far more time screwing around with P2P networks.

In fact, I even prefer iTunes to buying original CDs based on the same logic. I don't regularly visit CD stores, and generally can't be bothered going out to buy CDs. Further, I already have 400+ CDs sitting on a shelf that haven't even come out of their cases since importing them into iTunes. With iTunes I can buy a song or a whole album pretty much any time I want in less than a minute, and don't have to worry about finding a place to actually keep a physical CD. Again, that kind of convenience is hard to beat.

As far as bit-rates go, I've done a whole bunch of blind ABX testing, and my ears can't hear enough of a difference between 128kbps AAC and anything higher for me to care, so I'm not at all concerned about the bit-rate (and in fact have ripped all of my CDs to 128kbps AAC. Quality and bit-rate is extremely subjective, and I wouldn't waste time worrying about it until you do some legitimate testing for your own ears.