: OK, stupid question, please don't make fun...


dianmichele
Jan 25th, 2007, 10:51 AM
Hey there,

So I got my first MacBook (first Mac anything actually) a few months ago and I've been busy filling it with tons of music, etc. Occasionally it will run the FileVault dealy and will free up a bunch of space for me. Now, I've been a W user for years so of course I'm used to cleaning things up a certain way. But, I just can't seem to find a way to clear my temp files on the Mac (if this option even exists). It seems I have over 95000 folders and over 400,000 files. Does that sound right? I've read my MacBook for Dummies book and I don't recall seeing anything in there about this.

Thanks....you can laugh at me now!

Bjornbro
Jan 25th, 2007, 11:55 AM
Now, I've been a W user for years so of course I'm used to cleaning things up a certain way. But, I just can't seem to find a way to clear my temp files on the Mac (if this option even exists).
For fear of deleting something your Mac might need, don't do it. You wouldn't free up any real hard disk space anyway.

ShawnKing
Jan 25th, 2007, 12:09 PM
Occasionally it will run the FileVault dealy and will free up a bunch of space for me.
I'm not sure what that "delay" is but you probably really don't need to run FileVault.
But, I just can't seem to find a way to clear my temp files on the Mac (if this option even exists).
The OS is supposed to do that for you automagically but if you need to do it yourself, check out any of these apps:

Tiger Cache Cleaner
TinkerTool
Cocktail
AutoScrubber

Go to versiontracker.com and do a search for the above in their OS X section.
It seems I have over 95000 folders and over 400,000 files. Does that sound right?
Yup - OS X has a lot of files involved with it - not all of them are user accessible.
Thanks....you can laugh at me now!
No laughing here. We were all newbies to the Mac at some point or other. You asked a good question. Remember, there's no such thing as a stupid question - just stupid people. :)

Pelao
Jan 25th, 2007, 12:18 PM
An app Shawn did not mention is Onyx: highly regarded, and free:
http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/20070

dianmichele
Jan 25th, 2007, 03:18 PM
That's great, thanks everyone! I'll try one of those programs that was mentioned and see if that unclogs some stuff. Oh, and when I said "dealy", it just meant "thingy", there was no delay of anything. Sometimes I speak my own weird language, sorry!:o

winwintoo
Jan 25th, 2007, 03:25 PM
Just use your computer and forget all the paranoid system maintenance that you were told to do on Windows - it didn't do any real good there either :D :D

I've been using a Mac for 20 plus years and I do a lot with them and I can't remember the last time that I had to do any ferreting out temp files of removing clogs in the system.

The only think I do occasionally is run Onyx which has been mentioned here before.

Relax. Have fun.

I know a woman who had a PC tech on retainer and paid him about $300 a month to keep her computer working. She was constantly running utilities to clean out caches, temp files etc but still her computers were always in need of tech support. Of course the PC tech guy wasn't going to tell her that she was manufacturing her own problems.

Take care, Margaret

Pelao
Jan 25th, 2007, 05:18 PM
I know a woman who had a PC tech on retainer and paid him about $300 a month to keep her computer working.
:eek: :-( :rolleyes:

TripleX
Jan 25th, 2007, 05:42 PM
I would suggest not using FileVault unless you absolutely need to encrypt your hard drive. It is a major system hog and really bogs things down. There are also known problems with file retrieval and it tends to be buggy.

dianmichele
Jan 25th, 2007, 07:17 PM
Really? FileVault only does it's thing whenever I shut down. Sometimes it can take 10-15 minutes, but it frees up so much space. What are the common bugs that you know of?

winwintoo
Jan 25th, 2007, 07:41 PM
Why are you concerned about space? I guess coming from the early days when a 10 MB hard drive was considered huge, I can't understand worrying about space on a machine that has 200 GB of storage.

There are cases where a photographer or someone who does music would quickly fill it up, but not most domestic users.

But what do I know.

Margaret

dianmichele
Jan 25th, 2007, 07:55 PM
Oh, I only have 60GB on my MacBook. By the time all my music and pics are loaded, plus movies and TV shows, I run out of free disk space so I can't burn anything and then get it off the HD. I'm already looking at an external drive, for both backup and storage purposes.

krs
Jan 25th, 2007, 08:06 PM
Really? FileVault only does it's thing whenever I shut down. Sometimes it can take 10-15 minutes, but it frees up so much space. What are the common bugs that you know of?

How does FileVault clean up space?
I thought this was only an encryption tool for the hard drive.

As to the original question - My family has five different Macs that run OS X. I used to clean up preferences every once in a while until I read that was a waste of time. Checked with the other family members, they just use the Mac and do zip maintenance. have been doing that for years, ie no maintenance.
Seems to me OS X looks after itself (which in my mnd it really should - I want to do something creative with my computer, not empty temp files).

So, back to the beginning - I was really intrigued that that FileVault cleans up so much space.

dianmichele
Jan 25th, 2007, 08:32 PM
How does FileVault clean up space?
I thought this was only an encryption tool for the hard drive.
So, back to the beginning - I was really intrigued that that FileVault cleans up so much space.

I find it does. Before it runs I will have, say, 3GB left. After FileVault runs, I'll have 18GB. Maybe it's just a fluke, but if it works I'll keep doing it!

krs
Jan 25th, 2007, 09:46 PM
I find it does. Before it runs I will have, say, 3GB left. After FileVault runs, I'll have 18GB. Maybe it's just a fluke, but if it works I'll keep doing it!

Wow! That's unreal!
How do you determine that? Via "Get Info"?

Maybe the encryption somehow includes compression of your audio/video files as well.

TripleX
Jan 25th, 2007, 09:56 PM
FileVault is an advanced encryption decryption tool. It does not compress files nor is it able to free up disk space. As far as known bugs with this application, you can search the discussion forums at the Apple website.

winwintoo
Jan 26th, 2007, 11:37 AM
From what I've read, FileVault runs in the background while you're using your computer.

Is it possible that while FileVault is running and encrypting files on the fly, it's using up disk space and then when FileVault quits, it releases all that space?

I would think that while it's doing it's job, it requires a lot of resources - maybe rather than use your RAM, it uses disk space.

If it was me, I'd turn off FileVault and go about my business for a couple of days and just see what happens to the disk space.

Take care, Margaret

bryanc
Jan 26th, 2007, 01:18 PM
I think I may know what's going on here.

FileVault maintains an encrypted sparse disk image file, which can consume a lot of space even if you're not really using it.

If you're concerned about sensitive data on your computer, then I understand your need for this utility, but I'm wondering if you may have misunderstood it's purpose. Unless you're intentionally encrypting your data for security purposes, you're wasting a lot of space on your disk.

Also, if you're comfortable with the command-line, you can use the 'daily/weekly/monthly' system maintenance scripts to clear out unused temporary files, system logs, etc. If you leave your system running all the time, it will do this for you automatically, but if you're shutting your system down when you're not using it, it's a good idea to run these. I should point out that I've never heard of anyone having trouble with their OS X install because of not running these scripts, but, in principle, that's all the routine maintenance an OS X system needs.

To run them, open a terminal session (/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app) and type:

sudo periodic daily

at the command prompt. You'll be asked to provide your password, and it's safe to do so on this occasion. Then type:

sudo periodic weekly

this one usually takes some time, and it will clear most of the dreck that accumulates (not that this is much of an issue for OS X). Finally, type:

sudo periodic monthly

and that will do it.

If you're intimidated by the terminal, Onyx provides a nice GUI for this, and also does more cache clearing, and other stuff that can (rarely) improve system responsiveness.

cheers

jmlachance
Jan 27th, 2007, 05:21 PM
Thanks....you can laugh at me now!


This isn't like some pc forums. You'll get lots of help, advice and no one makes fun of newbies. Full fledge citizens on the other hand sometimes have to be careful...

krs
Jan 27th, 2007, 05:30 PM
This isn't like some pc forums. You'll get lots of help, advice and no one makes fun of newbies. Full fledge citizens on the other hand sometimes have to be careful...

If we need to chuckle we go here:

https://www.ehmac.ca/showthread.php?t=21471

120 pages to tickle your funny bone.