: Analog to digital recording


HURON
Dec 15th, 2005, 11:19 AM
What is the best way to transfer an Analog music source ( Cassette ) to my H.D. for CD burning?
With the right patch cords to connect the external source to my Mac can I use Garage Band to do this or do I need special Software . If so can I expect a good quality result ? I have some 80's party music that I would like to convert .
I am using an EMac with Tiger OS.
Thank you for any suggested help.

SINC
Dec 15th, 2005, 11:28 AM
I had the same question quite some time ago and got this result:

https://www.ehmac.ca/showthread.php?t=26218

HURON
Dec 16th, 2005, 02:39 PM
Thank you SINC , I will try out the referred answers to your query, although I have had no opinion on Garage Band as yet! What software did you use ?
Many Thanks

TheBat
Dec 16th, 2005, 07:53 PM
I use iMic (http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic2/index.php).

scootsandludes
Dec 17th, 2005, 12:09 AM
You would need hardware as TheBat suggested to connect it to a eMac, which by the way $$$, and also time spent recording all this stuff, and remember this is real time. After that, if you didn't do so already, you'll have to split each song off into an individual track, then name it, organize it.

Or (since you already own this stuff) P2P and just download it, but if you feel morally wrong doing so, there's always the ITMS, it might be cheaper this way than to buy the extra hardware you would need to record.

Or check music stores, there are a ton of compilation albums sometimes boxsets of 80's hits that are dirt cheap, you can also check out some of the used record stores too. 80's comp are cheap just cause there are so many of them out there.

Yeah and both of these suggestions would work out better since cassette is one of the worst things to ever happen to music. (In fact Phillips should send out an apology to everybody who ever bought cassette for giving us such a crappy format). Unless it's some super rare recording of The Smiths playing in a basement in Manchester that nobody has, it's usually not worth anybodies time to convert old tapes. It's time consuming, and your recording will only be as good as the master, and regular cassette tapes aren't that good to begin with.

vince

rubeole
Dec 17th, 2005, 12:48 AM
Yeah and both of these suggestions would work out better since cassette is one of the worst things to ever happen to music. (In fact Phillips should send out an apology to everybody who ever bought cassette for giving us such a crappy format). Unless it's some super rare recording of The Smiths playing in a basement in Manchester that nobody has, it's usually not worth anybodies time to convert old tapes. It's time consuming, and your recording will only be as good as the master, and regular cassette tapes aren't that good to begin with.

Most widely-available digital formats are sorely lacking in the quality department. The fact that 128/192bit is still considered a minimum standard for mp3 sharing is ridiculous and pathetic.

Without regards to sound quality, the cassette was actually one of the BEST things to ever happen to pop music, in that it "democratized" recorded material for the first time. Finally anyone could release their music! Some of my favourite songs of all time were made by some (then) unknown band playing into a well-positioned boombox. I should also mention the value of the whole cassette 4-track revolution of the '90s.

I won't go into a tirade, and I won't repost about this - but if the only cassettes you bought were (for example) produced by Phillips, chances are you won't appreciate the cultural value of the cassette tape. If you in any way were a witness to the underground music culture of the 80s and 90s - cassettes were a necessity.

Signed - a person who once sold a tape on ebay for $200.

CanadaRAM
Dec 17th, 2005, 01:53 AM
You would need hardware as TheBat suggested to connect it to a eMac
Why?

The eMac has an audio line-in port

eMac 2002 specs (http://download.info.apple.com/Apple_Support_Area/Manuals/specs/emac/L21330A_EN.pdf)
"Analog audio input minijack; up to 16-bit stereo and
44.1kHz sampling rate"

scootsandludes
Dec 17th, 2005, 11:19 AM
Most widely-available digital formats are sorely lacking in the quality department. The fact that 128/192bit is still considered a minimum standard for mp3 sharing is ridiculous and pathetic.

Without regards to sound quality, the cassette was actually one of the BEST things to ever happen to pop music, in that it "democratized" recorded material for the first time. Finally anyone could release their music! Some of my favourite songs of all time were made by some (then) unknown band playing into a well-positioned boombox. I should also mention the value of the whole cassette 4-track revolution of the '90s.

I won't go into a tirade, and I won't repost about this - but if the only cassettes you bought were (for example) produced by Phillips, chances are you won't appreciate the cultural value of the cassette tape. If you in any way were a witness to the underground music culture of the 80s and 90s - cassettes were a necessity.

Signed - a person who once sold a tape on ebay for $200.


I'll take a 128 bit mp3 over a a crusty cassette any day.

I've had my days of cassette trading, and I've paid good money for bootleg recordings on cassette. But even still, I would have rather paid for an mp3 of that recording, instead of dealing with cassettes. For the simple reason that I can make a million copies and copies of copies of that recording and it will still be as good as my original. Can't do that with cassette tape.

Cultural Value? I'm not some teenager here. I've spent hours and hours making comp. tapes for myself, and other people (kinda like in High Fidelity). Starting off on a piece of paper, making a track listing, and figuring out where each song should go, so it all flows together perfectly, so don't tell me about 'Cultural Value'. Oh and Phillips invented the Cassette tape. I don't think I actually owned any tapes made by Phillips. Underground Music Culture? Note on my original post about the reference to the Smiths recordings.

Signed a person who have spent thousands of dollars on Cassettes and Cassette players, and would never go back.

HURON
Dec 18th, 2005, 12:46 PM
Thanks to all for your valued input & opinions. Actually the quality of our Cassettes is very good. Fuji Metal Tape recorded on a high quality Yamaha Deck back in the '80's . Our favourite Music Era.... is why I would like to save them for Posterity.
I will try to do that.
Thanks again to all who replied.