: Question about prepping Macs for resale


taylorkim
Sep 27th, 2017, 03:57 PM
I have a number of old family Macbooks that have been gathering dust after upgrades. Time to sell them. I read the Apple support article:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201065

After reformatting the HD, I'm going to assume you need a disc to reinstall the OS. Or, is there a hidden utility partition that allows you to reinstall.

If I wipe the computer and set it to factory state, then the prospective buyer would not be able to test the computer without going through the setup process. Would it better to somehow wipe the computer of private information and leave the current OS? Not sure if I can actually do that with a high degree of confidence.

Any advice is appreciated.

CubaMark
Sep 27th, 2017, 06:02 PM
If it's a recent Mac, then Command-R at bootup to get to Disk Utility, where you can reformat and reinstall the OS.

Post-reinstall, create a "test" account. Username test. Password test. Or whatever. The prospective buyer can check out the computer at that point (just don't enter any iCloud info during the setup - you can skip that part).

The new owner can then set up a new user in System Preferences --> Users & Groups and delete the "test" account after logging-in to their own account.

taylorkim
Sep 27th, 2017, 10:27 PM
They are definitely not recent. 2007 or earlier.

CubaMark
Sep 27th, 2017, 11:11 PM
After reformatting the HD, I'm going to assume you need a disc to reinstall the OS. Or, is there a hidden utility partition that allows you to reinstall.

Okay - earlier than 2007. Recovery Partition was included once your Mac was upgraded to Lion (10.7), which was released in 2011. It's possible that you have it, and can simply do the Command-R (or Option key on bootup) to do the reinstall.

If not:

Check the Mac App Store, Purchases tab, to see if you have any of the OS X Installers available to download.

If so, do so.

Then do this:
How to create a bootable macOS Sierra installer drive (https://www.macworld.com/article/3092900/macs/how-to-create-a-bootable-macos-sierra-installer-drive.html)

(It says "Sierra" but applies to pretty much all previous versions)

Coolio?

pm-r
Sep 28th, 2017, 08:45 PM
After reformatting the HD, I'm going to assume you need a disc to reinstall the OS. Or, is there a hidden utility partition that allows you to reinstall.

Nope, no utility, hidden or otherwise on those old macs, and hopefully you have the original OS Install Discs to include with any sale.

Personally and due to Apple's lack of proper support for older OS versions, I would create a new "Tester" username user as admin, logo into it and Trash and delete all your own personal data.

Don't even bother adding any password if asked and the new user can login to test the Mac and also create a new admin user.

And don't worry about any Sierra or later install 'cause no 2007 Mac can use it. But El Capitan OS X 10.11 will work with a 2007 Mac with adequate RAM, but that's it and the end of the road.

BReligion
Sep 29th, 2017, 11:06 AM
I have a number of old family Macbooks that have been gathering dust after upgrades. Time to sell them. I read the Apple support article:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201065

After reformatting the HD, I'm going to assume you need a disc to reinstall the OS. Or, is there a hidden utility partition that allows you to reinstall.

If I wipe the computer and set it to factory state, then the prospective buyer would not be able to test the computer without going through the setup process. Would it better to somehow wipe the computer of private information and leave the current OS? Not sure if I can actually do that with a high degree of confidence.

Any advice is appreciated.

What I have always done (especially with a Vintage Mac of 2007 or pre) is if you have the the original setup/recover CD/DVD, boot from that and run Disk Utility. Zero the drive (might be called Securely Erase?) as many times as you feel comfortable with. (I think I normally let it run 7 times? maybe 3? I can't remember). I just start it high and come back a day later :)

Then install the factory OS from the CD, as mentioned above create a dummy test account and then shut er down waiting for the perspective buying to come a test.

Technically... you had to purchase the OS upgrade from Leopard to Snow Leopard. Then to upgrade to Lion and above it was "Free" since at that time it became tied to the App Store and your Apple ID. I am not sure what the legality is on selling a Mac of that vintage with a newer OS then what was shipped with it would be unless you are including the physical retail Snow Leopard DVD with it.... "technically" :)

BReligion

pm-r
Sep 29th, 2017, 01:56 PM
I am not sure what the legality is on selling a Mac of that vintage with a newer OS then what was shipped with it would be unless you are including the physical retail Snow Leopard DVD with it…. "technically"

As far as I can recall when going through the Apple End User License Agreement (EULA) with brother-in-law lawyer, the OS that was installed on their computer becomes part of that computer and all conditions of the EULA apply whether the OS was included at purchased or bought through a legitimate authorized source.

Also, as another example, if one had purchased a "Retail" or "Universal" copy of Snow Leopard, OS X 10.6.x, it could be installed on as many computers that one owned, but I think there was some odd clause about only one could be used at a single time.

Regardless, no one will be going to jail or be charged or fined if the Apple OS software is included with an old Mac model being sold or even given away.

If anyone wants to bother, all the Apple End User License Agreement (EULA) are available on-line to read:
https://www.google.ca/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=apple+os+eula&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&gfe_rd=cr&dcr=0&ei=ynPOWYmtBMHe8AfcyYagCw

BTW: How many users actually know that they don't own the Apple OS they happen to be using, but have only agreed to the End User License Agreement (EULA) to be able to legally use them.

Yeah right, and you all did read the whole last End User License Agreement (EULA) on any Apple device you're using right…, and agree to it??? … yeah right… !!!

Now to wait for that knock on the door from some OS police eh???

eMacMan
Sep 29th, 2017, 05:42 PM
I would be proned to create a clone of the best OS you have on an external drive. Boot from it and delete all personal files and any apps you do not want to pass along. Create the test admin account as described above and delete all personal accounts. Make sure you delete those accounts rather than simply storing them as dmg files.

At this point boot from the external and clone back to each of the computers.

Not exactly for the timid but depending on the number of computers could be faster and more reliable. You can also create an ASR disk image of the master at this point then do restore each of the computers from that disk image via the Terminal asr command. Just be sure to use something like SuperDuper to create the disk image as it will scan for asr. You may also have to select the start-up disk on the restored computer, or use the Terminal bless command to accomplish the same thing.

BReligion
Sep 29th, 2017, 05:51 PM
Also, as another example, if one had purchased a "Retail" or "Universal" copy of Snow Leopard, OS X 10.6.x, it could be installed on as many computers that one owned, but I think there was some odd clause about only one could be used at a single time.


If I remember right they were still doing the Single License and Family License pack for Snow Leopard... that was so long ago I don't recall.

With OSX since it hasn't required a "Service Key" or anything like Microsoft products I have always considered ownership of the physical media the right to use the OS. May be in the EULA.. may not *shrug*.

I bought my copy of Snow Leopard... it has been on a handful of devices I have owned, and when I upgraded to and sold the old device I did what I said above. I did factory restores with the original Discs.... just what I have done in the past.

BReligion

BReligion
Sep 29th, 2017, 05:54 PM
Yeah right, and you all did read the whole last End User License Agreement (EULA) on any Apple device you're using right…, and agree to it??? … yeah right… !!!



I can't remember if it was apple... someone years ago used to bury weird stuff in the EULA's. I think iTunes at one time talked about agreeing not to use the software to create nuclear weapons or something lol

BReligion

pm-r
Sep 29th, 2017, 06:56 PM
I think iTunes at one time talked about agreeing not to use the software to create nuclear weapons or something lol

I can sure recall the days when I had to send off a signed notarized copy of my identity and citizenship etc. to get my paid-for copy of the "Res-Edit" application, and I think maybe "QuickTime application", and it had just such a clause that I would not be involved with or disclose anything to anyone involved with atomic weapons and a bunch of other security stuff.

And I'm sure such clauses were still in much later Apple agreements.

Glad you brought it up as it just might be still valid and current considering some two crazy nation leaders lately, but also a good laugh as well.

EDIT:
Yup, just part, as you said:
10 Ridiculous EULA Clauses That You May Have Already Agreed To

iTunes – No Creating Nuclear Weapons
10 Ridiculous EULA Clauses That You May Have Already Agreed To (http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/10-ridiculous-eula-clauses-agreed/)

EDIT 2:
This is enough to make one gasp and choke, and it's only related to iTunes I believe.

Apple Media Services Terms and Conditions
https://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/us/terms.html

What's really scary are some of the conditions as well as the fact it was just recently updated:
Last Updated: September 13, 2016




- Patrick
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