: Is your Mac obsolete (or at least vintage)?


CubaMark
Mar 10th, 2016, 12:39 AM
Apple Obsoletes Mid 2010 15-Inch and 17-Inch MacBook Pros (http://www.macrumors.com/2016/03/08/apple-obsoletes-mid-2010-macbook-pros/)

Apple has updated its vintage and obsolete products list with three new products: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2010), MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2010), and Xserve (Early 2009).

(MacRumors (http://www.macrumors.com/2016/03/08/apple-obsoletes-mid-2010-macbook-pros/) - see also Apple's list of obsolete models (https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201624))

chas_m
Mar 11th, 2016, 02:04 AM
Most people, I find (excluding -- obviously -- the intelligent, thoughtful, and good-looking people who hang out here) have a very poor understanding of what "obsolete" actually means, at least in terms of computer equipment. What it doesn't mean is that it will stop working, or you should throw it out immediately. What it does mean is that Apple will stop manufacturing new repair parts for it, relying instead only on refurbished and harvested stock, and that these machines are likely (that's "likely" not "certain") to be off the list of compatible hardware in a year or two for the latest OS update. For parts and repair purposes, "obsolete" just means "five years old" and almost certainly unlikely to be covered by any warranty, and optionally any extended repair program.

For the typical Mac owner who may have one of these units, it means very little in the near term. Repair parts will become harder to get in a few years, and your machine will be off the list of systems that can run the latest OS (and thus, a little later, latest software) in a few years. Very occasionally, some kind of huge hardware shift occurs (like the switch to Intel, which was -- what??! -- 10 years ago??!), which "ages" old Macs a bit faster, but broadly speaking if your 2010 machine is performing to your expectations today, nothing much will change for at least a couple of years. After that, however, it's probably time to start looking at a newer Mac ... even if the one you're using is still running acceptably. Best time to upgrade is when things are running and just slow, rather then when you are, um, up a polluted creek without suitable means of locomotion.

MacMonkeyBoy
Mar 14th, 2016, 01:33 PM
Does anyone know if Obsolete means this stealth repair option is no longer available for these products? This is the program is where you can send a product in for Flat Rate Repair and they will do a full refurb for something like $379 but you have to know to ask.

Products go to Texas, I believe and it may take awhile, but they bring it back up to new specs if at all possible. My mid-2010 MBP is still ticking along nicely since the SSD upgrade two years ago so I don't need it but if you have display or other expensive issues cropping up it can be a great option. Dave and John from the Mac Geek Gab mention it occasionally.

monokitty
Mar 14th, 2016, 02:18 PM
Does anyone know if Obsolete means this stealth repair option is no longer available for these products? This is the program is where you can send a product in for Flat Rate Repair and they will do a full refurb for something like $379 but you have to know to ask.

Products go to Texas, I believe and it may take awhile, but they bring it back up to new specs if at all possible. My mid-2010 MBP is still ticking along nicely since the SSD upgrade two years ago so I don't need it but if you have display or other expensive issues cropping up it can be a great option. Dave and John from the Mac Geek Gab mention it occasionally.

That is not a Canadian option and never was.

monokitty
Mar 14th, 2016, 02:19 PM
Repair parts will become harder to get in a few years...

Units that are now classified as ~VIN have no repair options at all, effective immediately. Excluding generic parts like HD's and RAM that don't need to be Apple genuine parts. For the now Mid 2010 15", that means no logic board, display, airport card, etc., is available effective the date it goes officially vintage.

polywog
Mar 14th, 2016, 04:41 PM
I fear mine is getting there, and I'm on the cusp of doing some serious upgrades... I'm going external thunderbolt SSD as a new boot drive, which is a safe investment, but I want to go to 32GB, and that is not. 2011 27" iMac BTW.... it's had an amazing run, but I'm worried about future compatibility. Also the MXM video card that was part of the kit is pretty subpar, and was when I ordered it. I'm loathed to invest too much money into it though.

EDIT: P.S. It's pretty amazing that a 5+ year old computer is still perfectly useable. Hats off to Apple.

AquaAngel
Mar 14th, 2016, 10:48 PM
That is not a Canadian option and never was.

My recent Mac Pro that failed on me was deemed, not fixable as no one can get the parts for it and that was for a 2008 Mac Pro quad core 2.8 ghz. Rams are getting harder to find for that model, power supply is no where to be found unless you go used online like ebay of Used.ca and other similar sites.

Now that i have a 2010 model, parts are somewhat easy to find, but i'll give it another 2 years and parts will be hard to find for it

screature
Mar 15th, 2016, 04:10 PM
Your hardware and software may be in need of upgrades but if what you have serves you well now don't sweat it.

There is always "something better" coming. So stick with what you have until it does not meet your needs, then you can upgrade your hardware and software.

That is my nickels worth.

CanadaRAM
Mar 16th, 2016, 12:49 PM
2008 Mac Pro quad core 2.8 ghz. Rams are getting harder to find for that model

PSUs are a challenge, that's for sure.

RAM modules (FBDIMMs) so far are easy enough to get (from a company who specializes).

But of course we still carry RAM for PowerMac 68040 machines, so we're not an average retailer.

AquaAngel
Mar 20th, 2016, 05:36 PM
PSUs are a challenge, that's for sure.

RAM modules (FBDIMMs) so far are easy enough to get (from a company who specializes).

But of course we still carry RAM for PowerMac 68040 machines, so we're not an average retailer.

Then i should deal with you as my part guy is having some issues looking for some rams for my MacPro 2008 Model as it is currently at 18 gig of ram and go up to 32gig. :yikes:

HenriHelvetica
Apr 5th, 2016, 10:49 PM
i inherited an 08 Macbook and put in 350 in upgrades. Looking back, I prob should not have. Grabbed a SSD, some ram and just grabbed a battery recently as mine was just UGH. But I"m still USB2, no FW, 1280px screen (which is now impossible to work with)
I might have beeb better grabbing a used MBA w/ similar specs and better ports.

AquaAngel
Apr 6th, 2016, 10:25 AM
i inherited an 08 Macbook and put in 350 in upgrades. Looking back, I prob should not have. Grabbed a SSD, some ram and just grabbed a battery recently as mine was just UGH. But I"m still USB2, no FW, 1280px screen (which is now impossible to work with)
I might have beeb better grabbing a used MBA w/ similar specs and better ports.

i use my macbook 2008 on daily basis as i'm writing this to you with it and never had any issues with it. i'm the original owner of that wonder piece of machinery. LOL RAMs are maxed out and slapped a SSD disk "240 gig". the only thing i wish it had is firewire port.

For what i do with that macbook is good enough for me. if i want some serious power? i go to my office and work on my MacPro 2010.

I can do some gaming, but not like heavy on graphics as it will overheat, watching Youtube videos at high def, will also overheat over time. it is too bad that macbook doesn't have higher GPU. :( but i'm over all pretty happy with it. :rolleyes:

CubaMark
Apr 6th, 2016, 10:46 AM
I've had Mac laptops back to my original Macintosh Powerbook 165 (with extended desktop on external display in colour!), where I first began doing websites back in '93. And the late-2008 (https://support.apple.com/kb/SP500?locale=en_US) Unibody MacBook (http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/macbook/specs/macbook-core-2-duo-2.0-aluminum-13-late-2008-unibody-specs.html) was probably my favourite of all time (up to that point).

heavyall
Apr 6th, 2016, 08:26 PM
I wonder if the Apple Stores in Canada know that obsolete is supposed to mean no service, no parts?

I have had my 2006 white (NOT unibody) Macbook repaired (off warranty) at the local Apple Store a couple of times in the last year. One time, they sent it away for a flat fee, the second time they did a repair and replace while I had lunch in the mall.

zen.state
Apr 6th, 2016, 08:44 PM
The newest Mac I own was manufactured in 2005. I have six, and all are G4.

I run a combo of OpenBSD, Leopard and Linux on them, which allow me to do anything a modern system can, because I'm not limiting myself to Apple OS from 2007 or older, which are the only ones that support PowerPC. Leopard (10.5) was the last OS to run on PowerPC.

How can i possibly do this you may wonder? Well, because I'm not limited to point and click. MacOS and Windows are extremely bloated, so to use the current one you need to buy new hardware every few years. If you have UNIX and Linux ability though, you can install many different OS that will literally fly on old hardware.

My main system, which I am typing this on, is a PowerMac G4 Sawtooth (AGP graphics) (built in April 2000), with a G4 1.8GHz CPU upgrade I added in 2009. And guess what... I can play HD video on it. Something you need a quad G5 or intel Mac to play on OS X.

AquaAngel
Apr 6th, 2016, 10:55 PM
I've had Mac laptops back to my original Macintosh Powerbook 165 (with extended desktop on external display in colour!), where I first began doing websites back in '93. And the late-2008 (https://support.apple.com/kb/SP500?locale=en_US) Unibody MacBook (http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/macbook/specs/macbook-core-2-duo-2.0-aluminum-13-late-2008-unibody-specs.html) was probably my favourite of all time (up to that point).

We both have the same machine and it is still kicking. i bought a new battery for it last year and had i it rebuild with new thermal paste in it and that thing is still running strong.:clap: