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Old May 6th, 2008, 06:40 AM   #1
 
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Web design?

Hi everyone I just have a quick question, I have would like to start learning to design web pages, but I am not really sure were to start. Is it possible to use Iweb to design a web page for someone else or is it more for personal use. if its not then what are some good programs and then would there be a way for them to edit them selves from a pc?
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Old May 6th, 2008, 07:42 AM   #2
 
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For coding of webpages, Dreamweaver is king.

For graphics, you might consider Fireworks. Both are available as part of the Adobe Web Design Standard Suite.

It's best to learn HTML, PHP, and CSS for the background coding.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 08:21 AM   #3
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Webmonkey: The Web Developer's Resource

a bunch of great free tutorials to help get you started
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Old May 6th, 2008, 08:34 AM   #4
 
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Smashing Magazine is a nice site to go to as well.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 09:44 AM   #5
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Books can be a great place to start. Using tools like DreamWeaver (my first choice for creating websites) is great but you really should learn what is going on beneath the surface. Where to start with books:

If you know absolutely nothing the Dummies series of books may help.

If you are already half aware of what is going on, ex know what HTML is but don't know how to code it, possibly the O'Reilly Head First books might be good.

If you are a knowledgeable computer person (you know how to program, or understand IT) the regular O'Reilly books are great.

Ideally you should go down to your local bookstore and check the books out. Find one that appeals to you; it covers the area of interest at your desired starting point.

Lastly you should check out the book reviews on Chapters, Amazon etc. The book that most appeals to you may get bad reviews for a not so obvious reason.

There are some great online resources to, Webmonkey (mentioned earlier) being one of them.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 10:28 AM   #6
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Do you want to learn how to design or program?

There's a big difference.

If you're thinking of going into the web design world for work down the road, you would be a good asset to a company if you were strong in both categories.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 10:38 AM   #7
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Good observation dmpP.

I come from a coding perspective. I can whip together a great website really quickly. It have a lot of neat features. It will also be as ugly as hell!

I can't bridge the gap between programming and design; those that can are rare and valuable. If you can have a foot in both camps you will be that much further ahead.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 11:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guytoronto View Post
For coding of webpages, Dreamweaver is king.

For graphics, you might consider Fireworks. Both are available as part of the Adobe Web Design Standard Suite.

It's best to learn HTML, PHP, and CSS for the background coding.
I agree, I love it. But I still do a lot of hand coding (tweaking), so I would agree with the learn part as well.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 03:51 PM   #9
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I started out by teaching myself GoLive and learned the coding as I went along. I now use Dreamweaver and do a fair bit of hand-tweaking of the code. I always have the split view open - everything I do on the design side, I can see in the code.

Along the way, I've used many, many resources online to solve problems and learn new things. Looking at the code of sites you admire is always helpful too.

I would NOT recommend iWeb unless you just want to do a personal site. It doesn't allow you to truly mess around at the code level and has the most ridiculous site structure I've ever seen. (Every page is like a site unto itself) Among other issues...

Dreamweaver has a lot of built-in basic templates to get you started (just layout, not really design) - so you can start to learn the structure of a page with CSS layout by seeing what it does.

As for graphics, I use Photoshop, but Fireworks and Photoshop Elements are also good choices.

The downside of Dreamweaver and Photoshop is the cost of the software - neither are cheap. If you qualify for the student/educator discount, by all means use it as it cuts the cost by almost 2/3. And the web CS3 Suite has everything you'll need.

There are some free and cheaper alternatives depending on what you want to do. KompoZer is the free and most recent outgrowth of Netscape Composer/NVU:

KompoZer - Easy web authoring

It's not as sophisticated as Dreamweaver of course, but could certainly get you started.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 04:40 PM   #10
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Yes, a good alternative is NVU. I usually put my friends onto that.. saves getting HTML docs that come from MS WOrd ;-)
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