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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 12:48 PM   #1
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Rebel Yell!

So I picked myself up the Canon EOS Rebel XT yesterday (Getting the 75-300mm lens soon!), and while I am not the most adept with photography (yet!) I am hoping that some people could recommend some good basic photography books to check out.
I am looking for something that covers all my bases for information about ISO, AE, AF, shutter control, etc.

Anybody able to recommend anything?
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 01:13 PM   #2
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The manual that comes with your camera will give a basic overview of what you need and how to accomplish it. I'm still plowing through the manual for my Nikon D50. Along with instructions as to how to make settings changes, it should give some basic guidelines as to when to make changes and under what conditions (ie. when to use shutter priority mode or aperture priority mode). I have been tyring my camera and not getting very far but haven't delved into any third party books yet.

One option you may want to consider is taking a camera specific primer coarse at a local camera shop. We have Henry's here and they offer a basic coarse for my camera for about $65 +/-. Might be a good idea.
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 01:37 PM   #3
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the rebel xti comes out sept22 I'm waiting for that one.
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 01:51 PM   #4
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It's been a long time since I read any basic photography books.
The best advice I can give you is go outside and take pictures instead of reading a book.

There is only 1 mode that you should shoot with if you want to learn photography.Manual. Forget all the pre-set modes and auto modes, they're there for people who wants to buy an expensive camera and think that they'll get good photos because of it. If you want to learn, you need to know what you're doing, and that's why there's manual mode. Using manual mode can sound scary to a beginner, but it's actually very simple. I don't know what the viewfinder looks like on a Rebel, since I'm a Nikon kind of guy. But there should be something in there that tells you that your exposure is correct in the built in meter, and in the same area that tells you if your +/- exposed. Mine looks like this +IiiiiiIiiiiiI- when the meter is on in mine and exposure is correct, the centre "i" will be highlighted. Pretty simple eh? That's how I learned many many years ago.
It's with experience when you start to play around with exposure to get the results that you want.

When you get the hang of manual, try using the A mode or aperture priority mode, you set the aperture you want, and the camera will decide on the speed. If you want to drag the shutter, use S mode or Shutter Priority, you set the time you want, and the camera will decide the aperture for you.
On the camera forums, I noticed a lot people recommending the P mode for beginners. Bollucks. The only difference between P and auto is P will let you know what you're shooting at and will allow you to make changes. 2 grapes, who cares? Do that in manual and get the same results, and learn why you have to do that at the same time.

I only use these 3 modes as mentioned. I use AP and SP when I shoot natural light because I'm lazy. I use manual when I use a flash because I like to be able to control the amount of light I bring into the camera.

For ISO, the lower the number, the less sensitive to light, the caveat is the higher you go, the more sensitive, but then you loose on quality with noise (in the film days, we called this grain). The best way to figure out ISO is to use the lowest ISO you can, and gradually work your way up until you have a good working range without being too noisy.

But this is all pointless if you don't go out to take pictures, you can read all the books you want, but you still need to take a picture to get a result. The best part of digital is you can take as much as you want, and learn from your mistakes. Unlike film, where it costs money to make a mistake.

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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 02:05 PM   #5
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if you really want to read a book to help you

Ansel Adams - The Camera
- The Negative
- The Print

3 books covering all the basics
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 02:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacDaddy
So I picked myself up the Canon EOS Rebel XT yesterday (Getting the 75-300mm lens soon!), and while I am not the most adept with photography (yet!) I am hoping that some people could recommend some good basic photography books to check out.
I am looking for something that covers all my bases for information about ISO, AE, AF, shutter control, etc.

Anybody able to recommend anything?

The best book I ever picked up to explain the nuances of exposure / ISO / ƒ stops/ aperture / etc. is Understanding Exposure, Revised Edition by Bryan Peterson - Chapters has it for about $36
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 02:08 PM   #7
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I've been playing around with my Rebel XT in Manual mode after reading a 40 year old book (!!!) "The Pentax Way". Sure, the camera is very different, but the composition technique and manual controls are very much the same. Check out your local library for any old 35mm books. Everything still applies.
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 03:10 PM   #8
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Thanks for the tips!
I plan to shoot using Manual mode (I shoot this way with video) but I want to know the basics of the options I will be using before playing around too much with them. I have started in the manual already, but figured some other books would be good as well. Might take a one on one course with a guy here in Calgary, we will see!
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 03:32 PM   #9
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This might sound super harsh....(hope not)

Take it back and find a 20D. They are about the same cost now. If you are going to use that lens you will eventually have problems with the camera. The camera is plastic and doesn't support larger lenses well, especially the XT which is smaller than the original and has problems in this area.

For the money find a 20D you'll be much happier. If you don't care about using Canon verses Nikon I'd grab a D70s. A much much better camera than the Rebel XT.
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Old Sep 20th, 2006, 04:15 PM   #10
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I personally dislike the Nikon cameras, never liked the feel of them. I have known quite a few people with Rebels and Rebel XT that had larger lens' without any problems. Imma stick with it for now
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